Probiotic effect of Vibrio midae SY9, Cryptococcus sp. SS1 and Debaryomyces hansenii AY1 on the growth and disease resistance of farmed Haliotis midae

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Coyne, Vernon en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Macey, Brett M en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-15T10:19:17Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-15T10:19:17Z
dc.date.issued 2005 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Macey, B. 2005. Probiotic effect of Vibrio midae SY9, Cryptococcus sp. SS1 and Debaryomyces hansenii AY1 on the growth and disease resistance of farmed Haliotis midae. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13954
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Although the South African abalone, Haliotis midae, has been commercially harvested since 1949, successful cultivation of this species only began in the 1980s. Since then, the abalone mariculture industry has expanded dramatically and currently produces between 500 and 800 tons of abalone per year with a net farm gate value of approximately R125 million. However, disease has had a severe impact on the international aquaculture industry and is anticipated to become an increasingly important factor, together with the slow growth rate of H. midae, that will negatively impact on the further development and success of the local abalone mariculture industry. Thus, the future of H. midae mariculture in South Africa depends in part on the development of methods to enhance the growth rate and disease resistance of farmed H. midae. Erasmus et al. (1997) showed that abalone enteric bacteria enhanced digestive efficiency by secreting polysaccharolytic enzymes and it was suggested from these results that these bacterial enzymes could affect the growth rate of abalone. Furthermore, an overwhelming body of evidence has shown that probiotic microorganisms can significantly improve the growth rate and disease resistance of aquacultured animals. The aim of this study was to isolate enteric microorganisms from H. midae that are capable of hydrolyzing the various protein and starch substrates included in formulated abalone feeds. Upon identification, the selected microbes would be tested for their ability to colonize the digestive tract, improve digestion, growth and immunity of farmed H. midae. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Molecular and Cell Biology en_ZA
dc.title Probiotic effect of Vibrio midae SY9, Cryptococcus sp. SS1 and Debaryomyces hansenii AY1 on the growth and disease resistance of farmed Haliotis midae en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Molecular and Cell Biology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname DPhil en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Macey, B. M. (2005). <i>Probiotic effect of Vibrio midae SY9, Cryptococcus sp. SS1 and Debaryomyces hansenii AY1 on the growth and disease resistance of farmed Haliotis midae</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Molecular and Cell Biology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13954 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Macey, Brett M. <i>"Probiotic effect of Vibrio midae SY9, Cryptococcus sp. SS1 and Debaryomyces hansenii AY1 on the growth and disease resistance of farmed Haliotis midae."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, 2005. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13954 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Macey BM. Probiotic effect of Vibrio midae SY9, Cryptococcus sp. SS1 and Debaryomyces hansenii AY1 on the growth and disease resistance of farmed Haliotis midae. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, 2005 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13954 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Macey, Brett M AB - Although the South African abalone, Haliotis midae, has been commercially harvested since 1949, successful cultivation of this species only began in the 1980s. Since then, the abalone mariculture industry has expanded dramatically and currently produces between 500 and 800 tons of abalone per year with a net farm gate value of approximately R125 million. However, disease has had a severe impact on the international aquaculture industry and is anticipated to become an increasingly important factor, together with the slow growth rate of H. midae, that will negatively impact on the further development and success of the local abalone mariculture industry. Thus, the future of H. midae mariculture in South Africa depends in part on the development of methods to enhance the growth rate and disease resistance of farmed H. midae. Erasmus et al. (1997) showed that abalone enteric bacteria enhanced digestive efficiency by secreting polysaccharolytic enzymes and it was suggested from these results that these bacterial enzymes could affect the growth rate of abalone. Furthermore, an overwhelming body of evidence has shown that probiotic microorganisms can significantly improve the growth rate and disease resistance of aquacultured animals. The aim of this study was to isolate enteric microorganisms from H. midae that are capable of hydrolyzing the various protein and starch substrates included in formulated abalone feeds. Upon identification, the selected microbes would be tested for their ability to colonize the digestive tract, improve digestion, growth and immunity of farmed H. midae. DA - 2005 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2005 T1 - Probiotic effect of Vibrio midae SY9, Cryptococcus sp. SS1 and Debaryomyces hansenii AY1 on the growth and disease resistance of farmed Haliotis midae TI - Probiotic effect of Vibrio midae SY9, Cryptococcus sp. SS1 and Debaryomyces hansenii AY1 on the growth and disease resistance of farmed Haliotis midae UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13954 ER - en_ZA


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