Female bodies as text : disobedient representations of the witch

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Mills, Liz en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Berk, Anita en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-14T18:07:01Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-14T18:07:01Z
dc.date.issued 2001 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Berk, A. 2001. Female bodies as text : disobedient representations of the witch. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13895
dc.description Bibliography: leaf 40. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This paper is an exploration and explication of the ideas and theories that served to fire the journey of my thesis production, Hex, from conception through to performance. As a Masters student in Theatre-making with a leaning towards performance, my particular area of focus is the physical: female bodies as text. To delineate this further, I concentrate on disobedient representations of the witch: what are these; what do they mean and effect in our world and within women themselves? Since as Theatre-maker I variously switched mode from director (in the initial conceptual stages) to designer, writer and actor within the process, this written explication will similarly switch perspective as I weave through the issues at hand in the creation of Hex. I begin the paper with an introduction to the figure of the witch. A selection of examples of stage and screen portrayals of witches is given. I then describe the salient features of the witch's journey as represented from past to present, in order to shed light on the choice of witch characters which eventually formed the collage of Hex. This is followed by an exploration of the goddess I witch dichotomy, with specific reference to the presence or absence of her physical form as theatrically manifested in Hex. I delineate, define and exemplify the concepts of obedience and disobedience in witch representations. This leads to an in-depth look at the physiognomic I gestural language of the witch's body in performance, noting in particular its relation to a male gaze. The third and final section of the paper centres on the marginalisation of various witch figures. This serves to explicate the presence and meaning of certain key figures that appeared in various forms in Hex, such as the absent crone-wise-woman, and the happy childless mother. I conclude with a statement of my personal position in relation to the topic that inspired the explorative journey of Hex. The purpose of Hex was to imaginatively crack open the realm of the witch for the audience. For it is out of such pinholes that truth has a tendency to loom out, in her infinite number of gorgeous and appalling forms that, together, dance the jig of Life. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Theatre Making en_ZA
dc.title Female bodies as text : disobedient representations of the witch en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Drama en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Berk, A. (2001). <i>Female bodies as text : disobedient representations of the witch</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13895 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Berk, Anita. <i>"Female bodies as text : disobedient representations of the witch."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama, 2001. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13895 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Berk A. Female bodies as text : disobedient representations of the witch. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama, 2001 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13895 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Berk, Anita AB - This paper is an exploration and explication of the ideas and theories that served to fire the journey of my thesis production, Hex, from conception through to performance. As a Masters student in Theatre-making with a leaning towards performance, my particular area of focus is the physical: female bodies as text. To delineate this further, I concentrate on disobedient representations of the witch: what are these; what do they mean and effect in our world and within women themselves? Since as Theatre-maker I variously switched mode from director (in the initial conceptual stages) to designer, writer and actor within the process, this written explication will similarly switch perspective as I weave through the issues at hand in the creation of Hex. I begin the paper with an introduction to the figure of the witch. A selection of examples of stage and screen portrayals of witches is given. I then describe the salient features of the witch's journey as represented from past to present, in order to shed light on the choice of witch characters which eventually formed the collage of Hex. This is followed by an exploration of the goddess I witch dichotomy, with specific reference to the presence or absence of her physical form as theatrically manifested in Hex. I delineate, define and exemplify the concepts of obedience and disobedience in witch representations. This leads to an in-depth look at the physiognomic I gestural language of the witch's body in performance, noting in particular its relation to a male gaze. The third and final section of the paper centres on the marginalisation of various witch figures. This serves to explicate the presence and meaning of certain key figures that appeared in various forms in Hex, such as the absent crone-wise-woman, and the happy childless mother. I conclude with a statement of my personal position in relation to the topic that inspired the explorative journey of Hex. The purpose of Hex was to imaginatively crack open the realm of the witch for the audience. For it is out of such pinholes that truth has a tendency to loom out, in her infinite number of gorgeous and appalling forms that, together, dance the jig of Life. DA - 2001 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2001 T1 - Female bodies as text : disobedient representations of the witch TI - Female bodies as text : disobedient representations of the witch UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13895 ER - en_ZA


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