Discursive practices around film and music piracy in selected newspaper articles and radio broadcasts in South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Haupt, Adam en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Musundwa, Sibongile C en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-08-15T05:32:38Z
dc.date.available 2015-08-15T05:32:38Z
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Musundwa, S. 2015. Discursive practices around film and music piracy in selected newspaper articles and radio broadcasts in South Africa. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13765
dc.description.abstract This thesis analyses South African news media discourses on piracy to consider whether corporate interests or those of civil society are served by stories about copyright infringement and piracy awareness campaigns. This thesis employs critical discourse analysis to show that hegemonic interests are ultimately served by news coverage, made up of selected newspaper articles and radio broadcast over a ten year period, that frames a range of commercial and non-commercial copying activities as criminal acts. Two dominant frames are identified: piracy as an economic issue and piracy as a crime. The thesis shows how the harms of copyright infringement are conflated by ideologies of the 'pirate' as a violent criminal and 'piracy' as an activity against commerce. The thesis finds a fracturing boundary between the orders of discourse of corporate and civil interests and those of news media. Entertainment media, as one block, garners a way to construct and sustain alliances with news and information media (such as newspapers and news and talk radio), taking on an ideological form. When this type of consent is won, and thus elite interests served, the ability to ensure a richly sourced and diverse public domain and public sphere is compromised. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Media Studies en_ZA
dc.title Discursive practices around film and music piracy in selected newspaper articles and radio broadcasts in South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Film and Media Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Musundwa, S. C. (2015). <i>Discursive practices around film and music piracy in selected newspaper articles and radio broadcasts in South Africa</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13765 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Musundwa, Sibongile C. <i>"Discursive practices around film and music piracy in selected newspaper articles and radio broadcasts in South Africa."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies, 2015. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13765 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Musundwa SC. Discursive practices around film and music piracy in selected newspaper articles and radio broadcasts in South Africa. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Centre for Film and Media Studies, 2015 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13765 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Musundwa, Sibongile C AB - This thesis analyses South African news media discourses on piracy to consider whether corporate interests or those of civil society are served by stories about copyright infringement and piracy awareness campaigns. This thesis employs critical discourse analysis to show that hegemonic interests are ultimately served by news coverage, made up of selected newspaper articles and radio broadcast over a ten year period, that frames a range of commercial and non-commercial copying activities as criminal acts. Two dominant frames are identified: piracy as an economic issue and piracy as a crime. The thesis shows how the harms of copyright infringement are conflated by ideologies of the 'pirate' as a violent criminal and 'piracy' as an activity against commerce. The thesis finds a fracturing boundary between the orders of discourse of corporate and civil interests and those of news media. Entertainment media, as one block, garners a way to construct and sustain alliances with news and information media (such as newspapers and news and talk radio), taking on an ideological form. When this type of consent is won, and thus elite interests served, the ability to ensure a richly sourced and diverse public domain and public sphere is compromised. DA - 2015 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2015 T1 - Discursive practices around film and music piracy in selected newspaper articles and radio broadcasts in South Africa TI - Discursive practices around film and music piracy in selected newspaper articles and radio broadcasts in South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13765 ER - en_ZA


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