Information and communication techologies and the urban transformation of South African informal settlement communities

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Odendaal, Nancy en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Mitchell, Hylton en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-08-15T05:31:59Z
dc.date.available 2015-08-15T05:31:59Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Mitchell, H. 2014. Information and communication techologies and the urban transformation of South African informal settlement communities. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13759
dc.description.abstract The paper explores the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) practices of the Social Justice Coalition (SJC), a grassroots community based organisation working with informal settlement communities in Khayelitsha, a largely informal neighbourhood on the south-eastern fringes of Cape Town, South Africa. The study focuses on SJC’s advocacy work in the delivery of ‘decent sanitation’ to informal settlement residents. This has been an explosive political issue for a number of years now. Many communities within Khayelitsha rely on communal toilets for sanitation, and the maintenance thereof has left much to be desired. Within the larger theme of digital activism, three main research areas were identified and explored: the appropriation of ICTs by the SJC’s field staff, the use of their Web 2.0 based social networking sites (SNS) in their advocacy work and digital mapping of portable communal toilets in the RR Section of Khayelitsha. The research interrogates the use of ICT as a strategic tool for knowledge-based community empowerment, with the aim of understanding how these emerging uses of technology could assist urban transformation work within this sprawling area. The research emphasizes the roles of various actors, the roles played by different technologies and the relations between technology and people. The emphasis on agency reveals that technology is not enough to augment empowerment processes. Technology-organisational relations are enmeshed within an institutional frame, where the enrollment of technology as actor, requires a repositioning of network relations, in order for it to fulfill its potential as an empowerment tool. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Urban Planning and Management en_ZA
dc.title Information and communication techologies and the urban transformation of South African informal settlement communities en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPhil en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Mitchell, H. (2014). <i>Information and communication techologies and the urban transformation of South African informal settlement communities</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13759 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Mitchell, Hylton. <i>"Information and communication techologies and the urban transformation of South African informal settlement communities."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13759 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Mitchell H. Information and communication techologies and the urban transformation of South African informal settlement communities. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, 2014 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13759 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Mitchell, Hylton AB - The paper explores the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) practices of the Social Justice Coalition (SJC), a grassroots community based organisation working with informal settlement communities in Khayelitsha, a largely informal neighbourhood on the south-eastern fringes of Cape Town, South Africa. The study focuses on SJC’s advocacy work in the delivery of ‘decent sanitation’ to informal settlement residents. This has been an explosive political issue for a number of years now. Many communities within Khayelitsha rely on communal toilets for sanitation, and the maintenance thereof has left much to be desired. Within the larger theme of digital activism, three main research areas were identified and explored: the appropriation of ICTs by the SJC’s field staff, the use of their Web 2.0 based social networking sites (SNS) in their advocacy work and digital mapping of portable communal toilets in the RR Section of Khayelitsha. The research interrogates the use of ICT as a strategic tool for knowledge-based community empowerment, with the aim of understanding how these emerging uses of technology could assist urban transformation work within this sprawling area. The research emphasizes the roles of various actors, the roles played by different technologies and the relations between technology and people. The emphasis on agency reveals that technology is not enough to augment empowerment processes. Technology-organisational relations are enmeshed within an institutional frame, where the enrollment of technology as actor, requires a repositioning of network relations, in order for it to fulfill its potential as an empowerment tool. DA - 2014 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - Information and communication techologies and the urban transformation of South African informal settlement communities TI - Information and communication techologies and the urban transformation of South African informal settlement communities UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13759 ER - en_ZA


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