Exploring social cognition in patients with apathy following acquired brain damage

 

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dc.contributor.author Njomboro, Progress
dc.contributor.author Humphreys, Glyn W
dc.contributor.author Deb, Shoumitro
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-30T04:12:01Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-30T04:12:01Z
dc.date.issued 2014-01-23
dc.identifier.citation Njomboro, P., Humphreys, G. W., & Deb, S. (2014). Exploring social cognition in patients with apathy following acquired brain damage. BMC neurology, 14(1), 18.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13632
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2377-14-18
dc.description.abstract Abstract Background Research on cognition in apathy has largely focused on executive functions. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have investigated the relationship between apathy symptoms and processes involved in social cognition. Apathy symptoms include attenuated emotional behaviour, low social engagement and social withdrawal, all of which may be linked to underlying socio-cognitive deficits. Methods We compared patients with brain damage who also had apathy symptoms against similar patients with brain damage but without apathy symptoms. Both patient groups were also compared against normal controls on key socio-cognitive measures involving moral reasoning, social awareness related to making judgements between normative and non-normative behaviour, Theory of Mind processing, and the perception of facial expressions of emotion. We also controlled for the likely effects of executive deficits and depressive symptoms on these comparisons. Results Our results indicated that patients with apathy were distinctively impaired in making moral reasoning decisions and in judging the social appropriateness of behaviour. Deficits in Theory of Mind and perception of facial expressions of emotion did not distinguish patients with apathy from those without apathy. Conclusion Our findings point to a possible socio-cognitive profile for apathy symptoms and provide initial insights into how socio-cognitive deficits in patients with apathy may affect social functioning.
dc.rights This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 *
dc.source BMC Neurology en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcneurol/
dc.subject.other Psychology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Neurology en_ZA
dc.subject.other Apathy en_ZA
dc.subject.other Brain damage en_ZA
dc.subject.other Social cognition en_ZA
dc.subject.other Theory of mind en_ZA
dc.subject.other Emotion perception en_ZA
dc.title Exploring social cognition in patients with apathy following acquired brain damage
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2015-04-02T18:02:10Z
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.rights.holder Njomboro et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
uct.type.filetype
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Njomboro, P., Humphreys, G. W., & Deb, S. (2014). Exploring social cognition in patients with apathy following acquired brain damage. <i>BMC Neurology</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13632 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Njomboro, Progress, Glyn W Humphreys, and Shoumitro Deb "Exploring social cognition in patients with apathy following acquired brain damage." <i>BMC Neurology</i> (2014) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13632 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Njomboro P, Humphreys GW, Deb S. Exploring social cognition in patients with apathy following acquired brain damage. BMC Neurology. 2014; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13632. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Njomboro, Progress AU - Humphreys, Glyn W AU - Deb, Shoumitro AB - Abstract Background Research on cognition in apathy has largely focused on executive functions. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have investigated the relationship between apathy symptoms and processes involved in social cognition. Apathy symptoms include attenuated emotional behaviour, low social engagement and social withdrawal, all of which may be linked to underlying socio-cognitive deficits. Methods We compared patients with brain damage who also had apathy symptoms against similar patients with brain damage but without apathy symptoms. Both patient groups were also compared against normal controls on key socio-cognitive measures involving moral reasoning, social awareness related to making judgements between normative and non-normative behaviour, Theory of Mind processing, and the perception of facial expressions of emotion. We also controlled for the likely effects of executive deficits and depressive symptoms on these comparisons. Results Our results indicated that patients with apathy were distinctively impaired in making moral reasoning decisions and in judging the social appropriateness of behaviour. Deficits in Theory of Mind and perception of facial expressions of emotion did not distinguish patients with apathy from those without apathy. Conclusion Our findings point to a possible socio-cognitive profile for apathy symptoms and provide initial insights into how socio-cognitive deficits in patients with apathy may affect social functioning. DA - 2014-01-23 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/1471-2377-14-18 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Neurology LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - Exploring social cognition in patients with apathy following acquired brain damage TI - Exploring social cognition in patients with apathy following acquired brain damage UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13632 ER - en_ZA


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