An Investigation into the Night-Time Economy in Long Street

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Odendaal, Nancy en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Blecher, Mischa en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-01T08:57:53Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-01T08:57:53Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Blecher, M. 2014. An Investigation into the Night-Time Economy in Long Street. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13233
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This paper investigates the night-time economy (NTE) present in Cape Town, focusing on Long Street as its spatialized case, to ascertain the credibility of it becoming a 24 hour (24-h) city. A diverse and vibrant NTE is seen as the foundation of a 24-h city which is inclusive of the broader community. The concept, originally developed in the United Kingdom (UK) as the 24-h planning policy-package, sought to create active city centres at night by embracing a neoliberal approach to managing the NTE. This package revolved around getting people into the city centre at night, as well as promoting their participation in the NTE. This was meant to be achieved by the deregulation of liquor laws and some amendment of municipal by-laws. However, the policy-package had the opposite effect, and resulted in the proliferation of youthful adults engaged in acts of transgression and anti-social behaviours. Consequently, the broader community was driven away from city centres at night as they became designated spaces of ‘patterned liminality' -- when social order dissolved and transgressions were normalised. The research, conducted using a case study method, is comprised of primary and secondary data. This includes evidence from 16 interviews, a photo essay, and infield observations which together indicate that there are distinct parallels between the alcohol-fuelled and youth-dominated NTEs in the UK and the NTE found in Long Street. The research concludes that Long Street has become a space of ‘patterned liminality' where anti-social behaviour is acted out, resulting in an exclusionary effect for the broader community. In light of this evidence Cape Town can make no claim to be a true 24-h city. The dissertation concludes by suggesting recommendations aimed at creating a more inclusive NTE aligned with the 24-h city ideals. These include: temporary pedestrianisation, the extension of retail trading hours, amendment the Western Cape Liquor Act of 2008 to include a saturation point for liquor licences in a specified area, investigation of the feasibility of a night market, promotion of cultural events not centred around drinking, and ensuring that Long Street is a well-lit space at night. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other City and Regional Planning en_ZA
dc.title An Investigation into the Night-Time Economy in Long Street en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MCRP en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Blecher, M. (2014). <i>An Investigation into the Night-Time Economy in Long Street</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13233 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Blecher, Mischa. <i>"An Investigation into the Night-Time Economy in Long Street."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13233 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Blecher M. An Investigation into the Night-Time Economy in Long Street. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics, 2014 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13233 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Blecher, Mischa AB - This paper investigates the night-time economy (NTE) present in Cape Town, focusing on Long Street as its spatialized case, to ascertain the credibility of it becoming a 24 hour (24-h) city. A diverse and vibrant NTE is seen as the foundation of a 24-h city which is inclusive of the broader community. The concept, originally developed in the United Kingdom (UK) as the 24-h planning policy-package, sought to create active city centres at night by embracing a neoliberal approach to managing the NTE. This package revolved around getting people into the city centre at night, as well as promoting their participation in the NTE. This was meant to be achieved by the deregulation of liquor laws and some amendment of municipal by-laws. However, the policy-package had the opposite effect, and resulted in the proliferation of youthful adults engaged in acts of transgression and anti-social behaviours. Consequently, the broader community was driven away from city centres at night as they became designated spaces of ‘patterned liminality' -- when social order dissolved and transgressions were normalised. The research, conducted using a case study method, is comprised of primary and secondary data. This includes evidence from 16 interviews, a photo essay, and infield observations which together indicate that there are distinct parallels between the alcohol-fuelled and youth-dominated NTEs in the UK and the NTE found in Long Street. The research concludes that Long Street has become a space of ‘patterned liminality' where anti-social behaviour is acted out, resulting in an exclusionary effect for the broader community. In light of this evidence Cape Town can make no claim to be a true 24-h city. The dissertation concludes by suggesting recommendations aimed at creating a more inclusive NTE aligned with the 24-h city ideals. These include: temporary pedestrianisation, the extension of retail trading hours, amendment the Western Cape Liquor Act of 2008 to include a saturation point for liquor licences in a specified area, investigation of the feasibility of a night market, promotion of cultural events not centred around drinking, and ensuring that Long Street is a well-lit space at night. DA - 2014 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - An Investigation into the Night-Time Economy in Long Street TI - An Investigation into the Night-Time Economy in Long Street UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13233 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record