Fully printed transistors employing silicon nanoparticles

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Britton, David T en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Härting, Margit en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Walton, Stanley Douglas en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-15T07:00:30Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-15T07:00:30Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Walton, S. 2014. Fully printed transistors employing silicon nanoparticles. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13077
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract A new device, which utilises a previously unknown two-way mode of current switching, has been developed. This is the current switching transistor, a three-terminal electronic device which exhibits a transfer resistance, in which the application of a potential or injection of charge to one terminal controls the current at either of the two remaining terminals. The development of the current switching transistor arose from a more general project focussed on printed electronics using nanoparticulate silicon, with the aim of producing fully printed transistors. All of the printed transistors produced to date have been field-effect transistors (FETs), due to the fact that printing processes are easily applicable to the planar FET architectures. The majority of the work in the area of printed FETs has so far been focussed on the use of organic semiconducting polymers to produce organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). However, research has also been undertaken regarding the use of inorganic semiconductors, including for example, transparent metal oxides, compound semiconductors and silicon. Of the active devices, the key element is the transistor. It is essential, especially for its function as an electronic switch, in enabling a wide variety of technologies. Of particular interest are its applications in digital electronics, including logic gates, memory and comparators. The ultimate goal of printed electronics is to replace conventional electronic components with their printed equivalents, which requires the use of functional inks to deliver the desired electronic properties. Printed electronic components have potential advantages over conventional discrete and integrated circuits, especially in applications in which the printed electronics form factor is more important than the absolute technical performance of the system. Furthermore, the processes of fabrication of printed devices are far simpler and more cost efficient than those of conventional devices. This is particularly true for the current switching transistor, which can be realised by a simple two layer print. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Physics en_ZA
dc.title Fully printed transistors employing silicon nanoparticles en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Physics en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Walton, S. D. (2014). <i>Fully printed transistors employing silicon nanoparticles</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Physics. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13077 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Walton, Stanley Douglas. <i>"Fully printed transistors employing silicon nanoparticles."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Physics, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13077 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Walton SD. Fully printed transistors employing silicon nanoparticles. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Physics, 2014 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13077 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Walton, Stanley Douglas AB - A new device, which utilises a previously unknown two-way mode of current switching, has been developed. This is the current switching transistor, a three-terminal electronic device which exhibits a transfer resistance, in which the application of a potential or injection of charge to one terminal controls the current at either of the two remaining terminals. The development of the current switching transistor arose from a more general project focussed on printed electronics using nanoparticulate silicon, with the aim of producing fully printed transistors. All of the printed transistors produced to date have been field-effect transistors (FETs), due to the fact that printing processes are easily applicable to the planar FET architectures. The majority of the work in the area of printed FETs has so far been focussed on the use of organic semiconducting polymers to produce organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). However, research has also been undertaken regarding the use of inorganic semiconductors, including for example, transparent metal oxides, compound semiconductors and silicon. Of the active devices, the key element is the transistor. It is essential, especially for its function as an electronic switch, in enabling a wide variety of technologies. Of particular interest are its applications in digital electronics, including logic gates, memory and comparators. The ultimate goal of printed electronics is to replace conventional electronic components with their printed equivalents, which requires the use of functional inks to deliver the desired electronic properties. Printed electronic components have potential advantages over conventional discrete and integrated circuits, especially in applications in which the printed electronics form factor is more important than the absolute technical performance of the system. Furthermore, the processes of fabrication of printed devices are far simpler and more cost efficient than those of conventional devices. This is particularly true for the current switching transistor, which can be realised by a simple two layer print. DA - 2014 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - Fully printed transistors employing silicon nanoparticles TI - Fully printed transistors employing silicon nanoparticles UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13077 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record