A mathematical modelling approach for the elimination of malaria in Mpumalanga, South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Little, Francesca en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Barnes, Karen en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor White, Lisa J en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Silal, Sheetal Prakash en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-28T12:25:12Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-28T12:25:12Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Silal, S. 2014. A mathematical modelling approach for the elimination of malaria in Mpumalanga, South Africa. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13010
dc.description.abstract Mpumalanga in South Africa is committed to eliminating malaria by 2018 and efforts are increasing beyond that necessary for malaria control. The eastern border of Mpumalanga is most affected by malaria with imported cases in Mpumalanga overtaking local cases in recent years. Mathematical modelling may be used to study the incidence and spread of disease with an important benefit being the ability to enact exogenous change on the system to predict impact without committing any real resources. Three models are developed to simulate malaria transmission: (1) a deterministic non-linear ordinary differential equation model, (2) a stochastic non-linear metapopulation differential equation model and (3) a stochastic hybrid metapopulation differential equation, individual-based model. These models are fitted to weekly case data from Mpumalanga from 2002 to 2008, and validated with data from 2009 to 2012. Interventions such as scaling-up vector control, mass drug administration, focal screen and treat campaign at the Mpumalanga-Maputo border-control point and source reduction are applied to the model to assess their potential impact on transmission and whether they may be used alone or in combination to achieve malaria elimination. The models predicted that scaling up vector control results in substantial decreases in local infections, though with little impact on imported infections. Mass drug administration is a high impacting but short-lived intervention with transmission reverting to pre-intervention levels within three years. Focal screen and treat campaigns are predicted to result in substantial decreases in local infections, though success of the campaign is dependent on the ability to detect low parasitemic infections. Large decreases in local infections are also predicted to be achieved through foreign source reduction. The impact of imported infections is such that malaria elimination is only predicted if all imported infections are treated before entry into Mpumalanga, or are themselves eliminated at their source. Thus a regionally-focused strategy may stand a better chance at achieving elimination in Mpumalanga and South Africa compared to a nationally-focused one. In this manner, mathematical models may form an integral part of the research, planning and evaluation of the research, planning and evaluation of elimination-focused strategies so that malaria elimination is possible in the foreseeable future. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Statistical Sciences en_ZA
dc.title A mathematical modelling approach for the elimination of malaria in Mpumalanga, South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Statistical Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Silal, S. P. (2014). <i>A mathematical modelling approach for the elimination of malaria in Mpumalanga, South Africa</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Statistical Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13010 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Silal, Sheetal Prakash. <i>"A mathematical modelling approach for the elimination of malaria in Mpumalanga, South Africa."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Statistical Sciences, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13010 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Silal SP. A mathematical modelling approach for the elimination of malaria in Mpumalanga, South Africa. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Statistical Sciences, 2014 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13010 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Silal, Sheetal Prakash AB - Mpumalanga in South Africa is committed to eliminating malaria by 2018 and efforts are increasing beyond that necessary for malaria control. The eastern border of Mpumalanga is most affected by malaria with imported cases in Mpumalanga overtaking local cases in recent years. Mathematical modelling may be used to study the incidence and spread of disease with an important benefit being the ability to enact exogenous change on the system to predict impact without committing any real resources. Three models are developed to simulate malaria transmission: (1) a deterministic non-linear ordinary differential equation model, (2) a stochastic non-linear metapopulation differential equation model and (3) a stochastic hybrid metapopulation differential equation, individual-based model. These models are fitted to weekly case data from Mpumalanga from 2002 to 2008, and validated with data from 2009 to 2012. Interventions such as scaling-up vector control, mass drug administration, focal screen and treat campaign at the Mpumalanga-Maputo border-control point and source reduction are applied to the model to assess their potential impact on transmission and whether they may be used alone or in combination to achieve malaria elimination. The models predicted that scaling up vector control results in substantial decreases in local infections, though with little impact on imported infections. Mass drug administration is a high impacting but short-lived intervention with transmission reverting to pre-intervention levels within three years. Focal screen and treat campaigns are predicted to result in substantial decreases in local infections, though success of the campaign is dependent on the ability to detect low parasitemic infections. Large decreases in local infections are also predicted to be achieved through foreign source reduction. The impact of imported infections is such that malaria elimination is only predicted if all imported infections are treated before entry into Mpumalanga, or are themselves eliminated at their source. Thus a regionally-focused strategy may stand a better chance at achieving elimination in Mpumalanga and South Africa compared to a nationally-focused one. In this manner, mathematical models may form an integral part of the research, planning and evaluation of the research, planning and evaluation of elimination-focused strategies so that malaria elimination is possible in the foreseeable future. DA - 2014 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - A mathematical modelling approach for the elimination of malaria in Mpumalanga, South Africa TI - A mathematical modelling approach for the elimination of malaria in Mpumalanga, South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/13010 ER - en_ZA


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