Antecedents of work-family conflict among Hindu working women in South Africa: stressors, social support, and cultural values

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Bagraim, Jeffrey en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Jaga, Ameeta en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-28T04:13:26Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-28T04:13:26Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Jaga, A. 2014. Antecedents of work-family conflict among Hindu working women in South Africa: stressors, social support, and cultural values. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12951
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Little is known about the antecedents of work-family conflict (WFC) among Hindu working women in South Africa, a minority subgroup shaped by a unique set of historical, political, and cultural dynamics. Responding to repeated calls in the literature for the examination of work-family issues in unique cultural contexts, this study began with 20 in-depth interviews to elicit the subjective meaning that Hindu women in South Africa give to their work-family experiences. The qualitative data were analysed adhering to the principles of thematic analysis. These findings, together with a review of extant literature, were used to develop a new and culturally nuanced explanatory model of the antecedents of WFC for this specific context. The antecedents of WFC in the explanatory model include role stressors, sources of social support, and specific individual-level cultural variables. The study’s propositions were tested with survey data from 317 respondents. Psychometric analyses confirmed the portability of the measures and the bi-directional nature of WFC; work-to-family conflict and family- to-work conflict. Multiple regression analyses showed that a significant amount of variability in work-to-family conflict and family-to work conflict were explained by within- domain and cross-domain role stressors; with work overload having the strongest predictive effect on both directions of WFC. The results further highlight the salience of family in Hindu culture, noting that family involvement functioned as an important resource in reducing both directions of WFC and that food-work overload had a distinctive effect on WFC as a significant within-domain and cross-domain stressor. Results of further moderated multiple regression analyses confirmed co-worker support as an important resource for alleviating work-to-family conflict and for buffering the negative effects that work stressors can have on work-to-family conflict. Likewise, the results confirmed spousal support as an important resource for reducing family- to-work conflict; however, paid domestic support increased family- to-work conflict directly and when interacting with food-work overload. Moderated multiple regression analyses additionally showed that work involvement interacted significantly with gender role ideology in predicting work-to-family conflict and that family hierarchy orientation interacted significantly with family involvement in predicting family- to-work conflict. Overall, the results of this study strengthen the argument for the importance of uncovering and examining culturally salient variables in work-family research. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Management Studies en_ZA
dc.title Antecedents of work-family conflict among Hindu working women in South Africa: stressors, social support, and cultural values en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department School of Management Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Jaga, A. (2014). <i>Antecedents of work-family conflict among Hindu working women in South Africa: stressors, social support, and cultural values</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Management Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12951 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Jaga, Ameeta. <i>"Antecedents of work-family conflict among Hindu working women in South Africa: stressors, social support, and cultural values."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Management Studies, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12951 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Jaga A. Antecedents of work-family conflict among Hindu working women in South Africa: stressors, social support, and cultural values. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,School of Management Studies, 2014 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12951 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Jaga, Ameeta AB - Little is known about the antecedents of work-family conflict (WFC) among Hindu working women in South Africa, a minority subgroup shaped by a unique set of historical, political, and cultural dynamics. Responding to repeated calls in the literature for the examination of work-family issues in unique cultural contexts, this study began with 20 in-depth interviews to elicit the subjective meaning that Hindu women in South Africa give to their work-family experiences. The qualitative data were analysed adhering to the principles of thematic analysis. These findings, together with a review of extant literature, were used to develop a new and culturally nuanced explanatory model of the antecedents of WFC for this specific context. The antecedents of WFC in the explanatory model include role stressors, sources of social support, and specific individual-level cultural variables. The study’s propositions were tested with survey data from 317 respondents. Psychometric analyses confirmed the portability of the measures and the bi-directional nature of WFC; work-to-family conflict and family- to-work conflict. Multiple regression analyses showed that a significant amount of variability in work-to-family conflict and family-to work conflict were explained by within- domain and cross-domain role stressors; with work overload having the strongest predictive effect on both directions of WFC. The results further highlight the salience of family in Hindu culture, noting that family involvement functioned as an important resource in reducing both directions of WFC and that food-work overload had a distinctive effect on WFC as a significant within-domain and cross-domain stressor. Results of further moderated multiple regression analyses confirmed co-worker support as an important resource for alleviating work-to-family conflict and for buffering the negative effects that work stressors can have on work-to-family conflict. Likewise, the results confirmed spousal support as an important resource for reducing family- to-work conflict; however, paid domestic support increased family- to-work conflict directly and when interacting with food-work overload. Moderated multiple regression analyses additionally showed that work involvement interacted significantly with gender role ideology in predicting work-to-family conflict and that family hierarchy orientation interacted significantly with family involvement in predicting family- to-work conflict. Overall, the results of this study strengthen the argument for the importance of uncovering and examining culturally salient variables in work-family research. DA - 2014 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - Antecedents of work-family conflict among Hindu working women in South Africa: stressors, social support, and cultural values TI - Antecedents of work-family conflict among Hindu working women in South Africa: stressors, social support, and cultural values UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12951 ER - en_ZA


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