How reliable is morphological species delimitation in kelp? : a study of two closely related South African Ecklonia species

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Bolton, John J en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Rothman, Mark D en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Levy, Sarah Bernadette en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-27T04:10:12Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-27T04:10:12Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Levy, S. 2014. How reliable is morphological species delimitation in kelp? : a study of two closely related South African Ecklonia species. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12923
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Ecklonia maxima and Ecklonia radiata are both kelp bed forming macroalgae along the South African coast, and the latter is also found in considerable abundance in Australia and New Zealand. Genetically they exist as two distinct species and can usually be differentiated morphologically, especially when occurring as geographically separate entities. However, they do appear to intergrade when growing together, where plants of apparent intermediate and indeterminate morphology have been observed. This study tested the reliability of morphology in separating these two Ecklonia species across their intraspecific range of morphological variation, from locations where the species co-occur, as well as where they appear in isolation in South Africa (both species) and Australia (E. radiata only). No individual characters reliably separated between species, yet overall size distinctions as well as the morphometric separation of hollow and solid-stiped sporophytes provide good evidence for morphological differentiation of E. radiata and E. maxima. While E. radiata clusters morphometrically, a distinction between Australian and South Africa specimens is observed. In localities where the two species are reported to co-exist morphological distinction is less clear, particularly in deep water at Buffels Bay. The blade morphology of these deep water sporophytes is distinct from both E. radiata and E. maxima across all locations, while overall size distinctions contribute most prominently to the morphological separation of E. radiata and E. maxima at De Hoop. Environmental data in combination with more detailed genetic analyses, especially those aimed at hybrid identification, are necessary to resolve the nature of these subtidal plants as well as to investigate the relationship between genetic differentiation and overlapping morphology in plants at De Hoop. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Marine Biology en_ZA
dc.title How reliable is morphological species delimitation in kelp? : a study of two closely related South African Ecklonia species en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Honours en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname BSc (Hons) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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