An exploration of the experiences of Zimbabwean women informal cross-border traders at the Zimbabwean/South African BeitBridge border post

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Bennett, Jane en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Garatidye, Serita en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-26T14:06:49Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-26T14:06:49Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Garatidye, S. 2014. An exploration of the experiences of Zimbabwean women informal cross-border traders at the Zimbabwean/South African BeitBridge border post. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12839
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Much research on economically-enforced migration between Zimbabwe and South Africa locates women as partners of men, rather than as economic agents in their own terms. Research on cross-border trade, however, has theorized that gender dynamics may empower women traders as they learn to negotiate new business networks and as they develop economic independence; a different perspective on gender dynamics suggests that far from empowerment, women cross border-traders face particular abuse and harassment. This research worked with eleven Zimbabwean cross border traders to explore the theoretical tensions between notions of ‘empowerment’ and notions of ‘disadvantage’ arising from the traders’ experiences. The study concentrated in particular on the traders’ representation of their experiences at the Zimbabwe/South Africa Beitbridge border post crossing point. Analysing the material qualitatively, the dissertation argues that while gender dynamics can be seen to afford the traders both opportunities and great challenges, the traders’ representations of the interplay of official corruption and the impact of economic pressure on all border-players reveal the border-post itself as a complex site of micro-negotiations whereby survival becomes the ‘business’ itself. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Gender Studies en_ZA
dc.title An exploration of the experiences of Zimbabwean women informal cross-border traders at the Zimbabwean/South African BeitBridge border post en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Social Anthropology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname M SocSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Garatidye, S. (2014). <i>An exploration of the experiences of Zimbabwean women informal cross-border traders at the Zimbabwean/South African BeitBridge border post</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Social Anthropology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12839 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Garatidye, Serita. <i>"An exploration of the experiences of Zimbabwean women informal cross-border traders at the Zimbabwean/South African BeitBridge border post."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Social Anthropology, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12839 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Garatidye S. An exploration of the experiences of Zimbabwean women informal cross-border traders at the Zimbabwean/South African BeitBridge border post. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Social Anthropology, 2014 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12839 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Garatidye, Serita AB - Much research on economically-enforced migration between Zimbabwe and South Africa locates women as partners of men, rather than as economic agents in their own terms. Research on cross-border trade, however, has theorized that gender dynamics may empower women traders as they learn to negotiate new business networks and as they develop economic independence; a different perspective on gender dynamics suggests that far from empowerment, women cross border-traders face particular abuse and harassment. This research worked with eleven Zimbabwean cross border traders to explore the theoretical tensions between notions of ‘empowerment’ and notions of ‘disadvantage’ arising from the traders’ experiences. The study concentrated in particular on the traders’ representation of their experiences at the Zimbabwe/South Africa Beitbridge border post crossing point. Analysing the material qualitatively, the dissertation argues that while gender dynamics can be seen to afford the traders both opportunities and great challenges, the traders’ representations of the interplay of official corruption and the impact of economic pressure on all border-players reveal the border-post itself as a complex site of micro-negotiations whereby survival becomes the ‘business’ itself. DA - 2014 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - An exploration of the experiences of Zimbabwean women informal cross-border traders at the Zimbabwean/South African BeitBridge border post TI - An exploration of the experiences of Zimbabwean women informal cross-border traders at the Zimbabwean/South African BeitBridge border post UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12839 ER - en_ZA


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