The use of Iscamtho by children in white city-Jabavu, Soweto: slang and language contact in an African urban context

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Mesthrie, Rajend en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Hurst, Ellen en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Aycard, Pierre Benjamin Jacques en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-18T14:20:34Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-18T14:20:34Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Aycard, P. 2014. The use of Iscamtho by children in white city-Jabavu, Soweto: slang and language contact in an African urban context. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12813
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The work presented in this thesis relies on language recordings gathered during thirty months of fieldwork in White City-Jabavu, Soweto. The data was collected from children between the ages of two and nine, following anthropological participant observation, and through the use of an audio recorder. Strong attention was given to the sociolinguistics and structure of the language collected. This thesis is interested in issues of slang use among children and language contact, as part of the larger field of tsotsitaal studies. It is interested in: sociolinguistic issues of registers, slang, and style; and linguistic issues regarding the structural output of language contact. The main questions answered in the thesis concern whether children in White City use the local tsotsitaal, known as Iscamtho; and what particular kind of mixed variety supports their use of Iscamtho. Particularly, I focus on the prediction of the Matrix Language Frame model (Myers-Scotton 2002) regarding universal constraints on the output of language contact. This model was used previously to analyse Iscamtho use in Soweto. Using methodologies from three different disciplinary fields (anthropology, sociolinguistics, and linguistics) as well as four different analytic perspectives (participatory, statistical, conversational, and structural), I offer a thorough sociolinguistic and linguistic description of the children's language. I demonstrate that the universal constraints previously identified do not apply to a significant part of the children's speech, due to stylistic and multilingual practices in the local linguistic community. I further demonstrate that style, slang, and deliberate variations in language, can produce some unpredictable and yet stable structural output of language contact, which contradicts the main hypotheses of universal natural constraints over this output formulated by the Matrix Language Frame model. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Linguistics en_ZA
dc.title The use of Iscamtho by children in white city-Jabavu, Soweto: slang and language contact in an African urban context en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Linguistics en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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