A bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research productivity in Africa since the onset of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1974

 

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dc.contributor.author Wiysonge, Charles S
dc.contributor.author Uthman, Olalekan A
dc.contributor.author Ndumbe, Peter M
dc.contributor.author Hussey, Gregory D
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-16T18:52:34Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-16T18:52:34Z
dc.date.issued 2013-03-14
dc.identifier.citation Wiysonge, C. S., Uthman, O. A., Ndumbe, P. M., & Hussey, G. D. (2013). A bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research productivity in Africa since the onset of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1974. BMC medicine, 11(1), 66. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1741-7015 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12810
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1741-7015-11-66
dc.description.abstract Background: The implementation of strategic immunization plans whose development is informed by available locally-relevant research evidence should improve immunization coverage and prevent disease, disability and death in Africa. In general, health research helps to answer questions, generate the evidence required to guide policy and identify new tools. However, factors that influence the publication of immunization research in Africa are not known. We, therefore, undertook this study to fill this research gap by providing insights into factors associated with childhood immunization research productivity on the continent. We postulated that research productivity influences immunization coverage. Methods: We conducted a bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research output from Africa, using research articles indexed in PubMed as a surrogate for total research productivity. We used zero-truncated negative binomial regression models to explore the factors associated with research productivity. Results: We identified 1,641 articles on childhood immunization indexed in PubMed between 1974 and 2010 with authors from Africa, which represent only 8.9% of the global output. Five countries (South Africa, Nigeria, The Gambia, Egypt and Kenya) contributed 48% of the articles. After controlling for population and gross domestic product, The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau and Sao Tome and Principe were the most productive countries. In univariable analyses, the country's gross domestic product, total health expenditure, private health expenditure, and research and development expenditure had a significant positive association with increased research productivity. Immunization coverage, adult literacy rate, human development index and physician density had no significant association. In the multivarable model, only private health expenditure maintained significant statistical association with the number of immunization articles. Conclusions: Immunization research productivity in Africa is highly skewed, with private health expenditure having a significant positive association. However, the current contribution of authors from Africa to global childhood immunization research output is minimal. The lack of association between research productivity and immunization coverage may be an indication of lack of interactive communication between health decision-makers, program managers and researchers; to ensure that immunization policies and plans are always informed by the best available evidence. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source BMC Medicine en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmed/
dc.subject.other bibliometrics en_ZA
dc.subject.other childhood immunization en_ZA
dc.subject.other Expanded Program on Immunization en_ZA
dc.subject.other sub-Saharan Africa en_ZA
dc.title A bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research productivity in Africa since the onset of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1974 en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2015-01-15T17:54:22Z
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.rights.holder Wiysonge et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine en_ZA
uct.type.filetype
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Wiysonge, C. S., Uthman, O. A., Ndumbe, P. M., & Hussey, G. D. (2013). A bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research productivity in Africa since the onset of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1974. <i>BMC Medicine</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12810 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Wiysonge, Charles S, Olalekan A Uthman, Peter M Ndumbe, and Gregory D Hussey "A bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research productivity in Africa since the onset of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1974." <i>BMC Medicine</i> (2013) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12810 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Wiysonge CS, Uthman OA, Ndumbe PM, Hussey GD. A bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research productivity in Africa since the onset of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1974. BMC Medicine. 2013; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12810. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Wiysonge, Charles S AU - Uthman, Olalekan A AU - Ndumbe, Peter M AU - Hussey, Gregory D AB - Background: The implementation of strategic immunization plans whose development is informed by available locally-relevant research evidence should improve immunization coverage and prevent disease, disability and death in Africa. In general, health research helps to answer questions, generate the evidence required to guide policy and identify new tools. However, factors that influence the publication of immunization research in Africa are not known. We, therefore, undertook this study to fill this research gap by providing insights into factors associated with childhood immunization research productivity on the continent. We postulated that research productivity influences immunization coverage. Methods: We conducted a bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research output from Africa, using research articles indexed in PubMed as a surrogate for total research productivity. We used zero-truncated negative binomial regression models to explore the factors associated with research productivity. Results: We identified 1,641 articles on childhood immunization indexed in PubMed between 1974 and 2010 with authors from Africa, which represent only 8.9% of the global output. Five countries (South Africa, Nigeria, The Gambia, Egypt and Kenya) contributed 48% of the articles. After controlling for population and gross domestic product, The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau and Sao Tome and Principe were the most productive countries. In univariable analyses, the country's gross domestic product, total health expenditure, private health expenditure, and research and development expenditure had a significant positive association with increased research productivity. Immunization coverage, adult literacy rate, human development index and physician density had no significant association. In the multivarable model, only private health expenditure maintained significant statistical association with the number of immunization articles. Conclusions: Immunization research productivity in Africa is highly skewed, with private health expenditure having a significant positive association. However, the current contribution of authors from Africa to global childhood immunization research output is minimal. The lack of association between research productivity and immunization coverage may be an indication of lack of interactive communication between health decision-makers, program managers and researchers; to ensure that immunization policies and plans are always informed by the best available evidence. DA - 2013-03-14 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/1741-7015-11-66 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Medicine LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 SM - 1741-7015 T1 - A bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research productivity in Africa since the onset of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1974 TI - A bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research productivity in Africa since the onset of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1974 UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12810 ER - en_ZA


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)