Movement of the Cape dwarf chameleon (Bradypodion pumilum): are they vulnerable to habitat fragmentation?

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Tolley, Krystal A en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Altwegg, Res en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Rebelo, Alexander Douglas en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-04T07:14:02Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-04T07:14:02Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Rebelo, A. 2014. Movement of the Cape dwarf chameleon (Bradypodion pumilum): are they vulnerable to habitat fragmentation?. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12724
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Habitat fragmentation threatens the persistence of natural populations globally. Dispersal between populations can mitigate the negative impacts of habitat fragmentation. The Cape dwarf chameleon (Bradypodion pumilum) occupies heavily fragmented habitat and yet few studies have investigated their ability to disperse and thus persist. In this study I monitored chameleon movements and habitat use in the semi-transformed Noordhoek Wetlands, South Africa. Radio-telemetry was used to track adult chameleons (N=11) over 10 days during March 2010 and April 2014. Data were analysed using linear mixed effects models including relevant predictor variables. The chameleon habitat use, such as perch height, thickness and vegetation cover, including their GPS positions, was recorded hourly during the day. The increase in area used by chameleons over time increased at a relatively constant rate. Male and females showed similar areas of utilisation and daily displacement. However, males perched in higher, in less dense vegetation and on relatively thicker stems than females, although the latter two were not statistically supported. Additionally, chameleon vegetation use varied between day and night, but not between early morning, midday and late afternoon, where chameleons perched in higher and less dense vegetation at night than during the day. Habitats surrounded by wide spaces devoid of vegetation could isolate populations of Cape dwarf chameleons. However, the chameleon movement is unhindered by constraints of territory and by connecting habitat fragments together with corridors of suitable vegetation, the effects of fragmentation could be mitigated. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.title Movement of the Cape dwarf chameleon (Bradypodion pumilum): are they vulnerable to habitat fragmentation? en_ZA
dc.type Bachelor Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Honours
dc.type.qualificationname BSc (Hons) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Rebelo, A. D. (2014). <i>Movement of the Cape dwarf chameleon (Bradypodion pumilum): are they vulnerable to habitat fragmentation?</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12724 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Rebelo, Alexander Douglas. <i>"Movement of the Cape dwarf chameleon (Bradypodion pumilum): are they vulnerable to habitat fragmentation?."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12724 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Rebelo AD. Movement of the Cape dwarf chameleon (Bradypodion pumilum): are they vulnerable to habitat fragmentation?. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2014 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12724 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Rebelo, Alexander Douglas AB - Habitat fragmentation threatens the persistence of natural populations globally. Dispersal between populations can mitigate the negative impacts of habitat fragmentation. The Cape dwarf chameleon (Bradypodion pumilum) occupies heavily fragmented habitat and yet few studies have investigated their ability to disperse and thus persist. In this study I monitored chameleon movements and habitat use in the semi-transformed Noordhoek Wetlands, South Africa. Radio-telemetry was used to track adult chameleons (N=11) over 10 days during March 2010 and April 2014. Data were analysed using linear mixed effects models including relevant predictor variables. The chameleon habitat use, such as perch height, thickness and vegetation cover, including their GPS positions, was recorded hourly during the day. The increase in area used by chameleons over time increased at a relatively constant rate. Male and females showed similar areas of utilisation and daily displacement. However, males perched in higher, in less dense vegetation and on relatively thicker stems than females, although the latter two were not statistically supported. Additionally, chameleon vegetation use varied between day and night, but not between early morning, midday and late afternoon, where chameleons perched in higher and less dense vegetation at night than during the day. Habitats surrounded by wide spaces devoid of vegetation could isolate populations of Cape dwarf chameleons. However, the chameleon movement is unhindered by constraints of territory and by connecting habitat fragments together with corridors of suitable vegetation, the effects of fragmentation could be mitigated. DA - 2014 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - Movement of the Cape dwarf chameleon (Bradypodion pumilum): are they vulnerable to habitat fragmentation? TI - Movement of the Cape dwarf chameleon (Bradypodion pumilum): are they vulnerable to habitat fragmentation? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12724 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record