Exploring the causes of and mitigation options for human-predator conflict on game ranches in Botswana: How is coexistence possible?

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Underhill, Les en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Boast, Lorraine Kara en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-04T07:13:54Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-04T07:13:54Z
dc.date.issued 2014 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Boast, L. 2014. Exploring the causes of and mitigation options for human-predator conflict on game ranches in Botswana: How is coexistence possible?. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12722
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Large carnivores in southern Africa are threatened by habitat loss and persecution by humans. Game ranches have the potential to provide habitat for free-ranging predators, but carnivore depredation on game-stock can result in human-predator conflict, and the industry's role in predator conservation has been described as a gap in knowledge. The density of predators on Botswana commercial farmland was calculated using spoor and camera-trap surveys. Scat-analysis was used to determine the proportion of livestock and game-stock in the cheetah's diet, the species reported to cause the biggest economic losses on Botswana game ranches. Questionnaires to determine the direct costs, drivers and potential mitigation methods of human-predator conflict, were conducted with a representative from 86.2% of registered game ranches in Botswana, plus an additional 27 livestock farmers. The effectiveness of translocating 'problem' predators was analysed using questionnaires with farmers and survival data from 11 GPS-collared 'problem' cheetahs. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.title Exploring the causes of and mitigation options for human-predator conflict on game ranches in Botswana: How is coexistence possible? en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Boast, L. K. (2014). <i>Exploring the causes of and mitigation options for human-predator conflict on game ranches in Botswana: How is coexistence possible?</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12722 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Boast, Lorraine Kara. <i>"Exploring the causes of and mitigation options for human-predator conflict on game ranches in Botswana: How is coexistence possible?."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12722 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Boast LK. Exploring the causes of and mitigation options for human-predator conflict on game ranches in Botswana: How is coexistence possible?. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2014 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12722 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Boast, Lorraine Kara AB - Large carnivores in southern Africa are threatened by habitat loss and persecution by humans. Game ranches have the potential to provide habitat for free-ranging predators, but carnivore depredation on game-stock can result in human-predator conflict, and the industry's role in predator conservation has been described as a gap in knowledge. The density of predators on Botswana commercial farmland was calculated using spoor and camera-trap surveys. Scat-analysis was used to determine the proportion of livestock and game-stock in the cheetah's diet, the species reported to cause the biggest economic losses on Botswana game ranches. Questionnaires to determine the direct costs, drivers and potential mitigation methods of human-predator conflict, were conducted with a representative from 86.2% of registered game ranches in Botswana, plus an additional 27 livestock farmers. The effectiveness of translocating 'problem' predators was analysed using questionnaires with farmers and survival data from 11 GPS-collared 'problem' cheetahs. DA - 2014 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 T1 - Exploring the causes of and mitigation options for human-predator conflict on game ranches in Botswana: How is coexistence possible? TI - Exploring the causes of and mitigation options for human-predator conflict on game ranches in Botswana: How is coexistence possible? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12722 ER - en_ZA


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