Politics of pride : why do people participate in civil society in South Africa?

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Seekings, Jeremy en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Togawa, Shotaro en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-04-02T13:54:37Z
dc.date.available 2015-04-02T13:54:37Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Togawa, S. 2011. Politics of pride : why do people participate in civil society in South Africa?. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12633
dc.description Includes abstract.~Includes bibliographical references (leaves 76-82). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Civil society in South Africa is generally celebrated as a space for action to promote social justice, either through organisations that play the role of “watchdog” or through mobilisation by the poor themselves around their own concerns. However, civil society can reflect and reproduce many of the pathologies and injustices of the wider society. Sometimes it works to benefit a specific ethnic group or political group, and also reflects some unsatisfactory aspects of culture to which the constituents of civil society belong. In this study, both qualitative and quantitative analyses show that the associational activities and social movements in Cape Town reflect some kind of pathologies or injustices of the wider society. Sometimes it works to benefit a specific ethnic group or political group, and also reflects some unsatisfactory aspects of culture to which the constituents of civil society belong. In this study, both qualitative and quantitative analyses show that the associational activities and social movements in Cape Town reflect some kind of pathologies or injustices of the wider society. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Development Studies en_ZA
dc.title Politics of pride : why do people participate in civil society in South Africa? en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Social Development en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPhil en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Togawa, S. (2011). <i>Politics of pride : why do people participate in civil society in South Africa?</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Social Development. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12633 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Togawa, Shotaro. <i>"Politics of pride : why do people participate in civil society in South Africa?."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Social Development, 2011. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12633 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Togawa S. Politics of pride : why do people participate in civil society in South Africa?. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Social Development, 2011 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12633 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Togawa, Shotaro AB - Civil society in South Africa is generally celebrated as a space for action to promote social justice, either through organisations that play the role of “watchdog” or through mobilisation by the poor themselves around their own concerns. However, civil society can reflect and reproduce many of the pathologies and injustices of the wider society. Sometimes it works to benefit a specific ethnic group or political group, and also reflects some unsatisfactory aspects of culture to which the constituents of civil society belong. In this study, both qualitative and quantitative analyses show that the associational activities and social movements in Cape Town reflect some kind of pathologies or injustices of the wider society. Sometimes it works to benefit a specific ethnic group or political group, and also reflects some unsatisfactory aspects of culture to which the constituents of civil society belong. In this study, both qualitative and quantitative analyses show that the associational activities and social movements in Cape Town reflect some kind of pathologies or injustices of the wider society. DA - 2011 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2011 T1 - Politics of pride : why do people participate in civil society in South Africa? TI - Politics of pride : why do people participate in civil society in South Africa? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12633 ER - en_ZA


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