Small scale desalination in South Africa with particular reference to solar distillation

 

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dc.contributor.author Still, David Allen en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-03-09T13:50:34Z
dc.date.available 2015-03-09T13:50:34Z
dc.date.issued 1991 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Still, D. 1991. Small scale desalination in South Africa with particular reference to solar distillation. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12585
dc.description Includes bibliography. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Communities living in the remote, arid parts of South Africa are often reliant on brackish groundwater for their drinking water, sometimes to the detriment of their health. The quality of their drinking water is of concern to these communities and they are willing to pay for the means of improving their drinking water quality. A market survey indicated that an affordable price for a family desalination unit producing an average of 20 litres of drinking water per day would be R750. Conventional technologies such as Reverse Osmosis, Electrodialysis and Ion Exchange are generally too expensive and complex for application at demands of below 100 litres per day. Solar distillation, on the other hand, is well suited to such micro-scale applications. The technology has been widely reported on internationally, particularly since 1945, but is little known in South Africa. Experimental work was done on both a basin still and on inclined wick stills, single and multiple effect, in order to ascertain reliability and cost-effectiveness. The single effect inclined wick still was found to be the most promising and its design was investigated for the effect of parameters such as basin depth, feed rate, feed salinity and wick type. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Civil Engineering en_ZA
dc.title Small scale desalination in South Africa with particular reference to solar distillation en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Department of Civil Engineering en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Still, D. A. (1991). <i>Small scale desalination in South Africa with particular reference to solar distillation</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12585 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Still, David Allen. <i>"Small scale desalination in South Africa with particular reference to solar distillation."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 1991. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12585 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Still DA. Small scale desalination in South Africa with particular reference to solar distillation. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Civil Engineering, 1991 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12585 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Still, David Allen AB - Communities living in the remote, arid parts of South Africa are often reliant on brackish groundwater for their drinking water, sometimes to the detriment of their health. The quality of their drinking water is of concern to these communities and they are willing to pay for the means of improving their drinking water quality. A market survey indicated that an affordable price for a family desalination unit producing an average of 20 litres of drinking water per day would be R750. Conventional technologies such as Reverse Osmosis, Electrodialysis and Ion Exchange are generally too expensive and complex for application at demands of below 100 litres per day. Solar distillation, on the other hand, is well suited to such micro-scale applications. The technology has been widely reported on internationally, particularly since 1945, but is little known in South Africa. Experimental work was done on both a basin still and on inclined wick stills, single and multiple effect, in order to ascertain reliability and cost-effectiveness. The single effect inclined wick still was found to be the most promising and its design was investigated for the effect of parameters such as basin depth, feed rate, feed salinity and wick type. DA - 1991 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 1991 T1 - Small scale desalination in South Africa with particular reference to solar distillation TI - Small scale desalination in South Africa with particular reference to solar distillation UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12585 ER - en_ZA


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