Characterising the acid mine drainage potential of fine coal wastes

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Broadhurst, Jennifer Lee en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Becker, Megan en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Harrison, STL en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Franzidis, Jean-Paul en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Kotelo, Lerato Olga en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-03-04T19:27:27Z
dc.date.available 2015-03-04T19:27:27Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Kotelo, L. 2013. Characterising the acid mine drainage potential of fine coal wastes. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12574
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Acid mine drainage (AMD) is one of the major environmental challenges facing the South African mining sector. Acid mine drainage has received significant public attention in recent years. South Africa's long mining history has led to a growing concern that coal-related AMD from these mines (both operational and defunct) will continue for centuries to come. Pyrite bearing fine waste, generated during coal preparation and beneficiation, is thought to carry a significant amount of AMD pollution risk. Coal-related AMD generation has not been afforded the same exposure as AMD generation from high sulphide minerals such as gold and copper ores. This is exacerbated by the growing concern over water quality degradation in the Mpumalanga region of South Africa. The development of integrated solutions to address the management of coal-related AMD requires an understanding of the principle causes behind coal-related AMD. To date, most of the prediction methods described in literature have been derived for the prediction of AMD in metal bearing ores. Furthermore, some of these methods are based on assumptions and do not take into consideration the various sulphur species present. Additionally, some of these methods have limited applicability to coal due to the high total organic carbon content (TOC) of the material. This research project attempts to address these short comings and uncertainties by developing a systematic and meaningful framework for the characterisation of South African coal and coal waste. The research project contributes to the knowledge of coal-related AMD with particular emphasis on the characterisation methods responsible for sulphur speciation and mineralogy for coal. The approach entails carrying out a case study assessment aimed at empirically assessing a coal tailings sample according to: particle size distribution, textural reference, mineralogical characteristics, and how the aforementioned factors influence the acid potential in coal. The approach intends to address key factors which include: identifying the sulphur bearing organic and inorganic constituents related AMD generation in coal, assessing how the mineralogy, texture and particle size distribution contribute to AMD potential in coal tailings, and then identifying suitable analytical techniques and test methods which can provide data. The combination of these key outcomes will seek to provide a systematic and meaningful framework for the characterisation of coal and coal waste streams. The characterisation methods used in this case study outlined a framework focusing on four main areas of acid mine drainage characterisation for coal wastes, these included: chemical characterisation, mineralogical characterisation, sulphur speciation and AMD prediction. This comprehensive approach employed a suite of techniques, including: petrography, quantitative x-ray diffraction (QXRD) and quantitative evaluation of minerals by scanning electron spectrometry (QEMSCAN). en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Bioprocess Engineering en_ZA
dc.title Characterising the acid mine drainage potential of fine coal wastes en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment
dc.publisher.department Centre for Bioprocess Engineering Research en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Kotelo, L. O. (2013). <i>Characterising the acid mine drainage potential of fine coal wastes</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Chemical Engineering. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12574 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Kotelo, Lerato Olga. <i>"Characterising the acid mine drainage potential of fine coal wastes."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Chemical Engineering, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12574 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Kotelo LO. Characterising the acid mine drainage potential of fine coal wastes. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment ,Department of Chemical Engineering, 2013 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12574 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Kotelo, Lerato Olga AB - Acid mine drainage (AMD) is one of the major environmental challenges facing the South African mining sector. Acid mine drainage has received significant public attention in recent years. South Africa's long mining history has led to a growing concern that coal-related AMD from these mines (both operational and defunct) will continue for centuries to come. Pyrite bearing fine waste, generated during coal preparation and beneficiation, is thought to carry a significant amount of AMD pollution risk. Coal-related AMD generation has not been afforded the same exposure as AMD generation from high sulphide minerals such as gold and copper ores. This is exacerbated by the growing concern over water quality degradation in the Mpumalanga region of South Africa. The development of integrated solutions to address the management of coal-related AMD requires an understanding of the principle causes behind coal-related AMD. To date, most of the prediction methods described in literature have been derived for the prediction of AMD in metal bearing ores. Furthermore, some of these methods are based on assumptions and do not take into consideration the various sulphur species present. Additionally, some of these methods have limited applicability to coal due to the high total organic carbon content (TOC) of the material. This research project attempts to address these short comings and uncertainties by developing a systematic and meaningful framework for the characterisation of South African coal and coal waste. The research project contributes to the knowledge of coal-related AMD with particular emphasis on the characterisation methods responsible for sulphur speciation and mineralogy for coal. The approach entails carrying out a case study assessment aimed at empirically assessing a coal tailings sample according to: particle size distribution, textural reference, mineralogical characteristics, and how the aforementioned factors influence the acid potential in coal. The approach intends to address key factors which include: identifying the sulphur bearing organic and inorganic constituents related AMD generation in coal, assessing how the mineralogy, texture and particle size distribution contribute to AMD potential in coal tailings, and then identifying suitable analytical techniques and test methods which can provide data. The combination of these key outcomes will seek to provide a systematic and meaningful framework for the characterisation of coal and coal waste streams. The characterisation methods used in this case study outlined a framework focusing on four main areas of acid mine drainage characterisation for coal wastes, these included: chemical characterisation, mineralogical characterisation, sulphur speciation and AMD prediction. This comprehensive approach employed a suite of techniques, including: petrography, quantitative x-ray diffraction (QXRD) and quantitative evaluation of minerals by scanning electron spectrometry (QEMSCAN). DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Characterising the acid mine drainage potential of fine coal wastes TI - Characterising the acid mine drainage potential of fine coal wastes UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12574 ER - en_ZA


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