A review of living donor liver transplantation: why is regeneration more rapid in the recipient compared to the donor?

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Kahn, Delawir en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Ibirogba, Sheriff B en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-02-17T13:03:08Z
dc.date.available 2015-02-17T13:03:08Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Ibirogba, S. 2009. A review of living donor liver transplantation: why is regeneration more rapid in the recipient compared to the donor?. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12516
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 54-62). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is now well established and performed on a routine basis in many major centres around the world. LDLT is feasible because of the capacity of both the remnant donor liver and the transplanted partial liver to undergo liver regeneration. However it has been demonstrated that liver regeneration in the recipient is rapid, whereas restoration of liver mass in the donor is delayed. This discrepancy in the rate of regeneration could be due to the presence of hepatotrophic factors and the use of immunosuppression in the recipient. The aims of the studies were to determine if hepatotrophic factors and immunosuppression (Cyclosporine) could modify the restoration of the liver mass after partial hepatectomy in rats. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Surgery en_ZA
dc.title A review of living donor liver transplantation: why is regeneration more rapid in the recipient compared to the donor? en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Surgery en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MMed en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Ibirogba, S. B. (2009). <i>A review of living donor liver transplantation: why is regeneration more rapid in the recipient compared to the donor?</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Surgery. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12516 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Ibirogba, Sheriff B. <i>"A review of living donor liver transplantation: why is regeneration more rapid in the recipient compared to the donor?."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Surgery, 2009. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12516 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Ibirogba SB. A review of living donor liver transplantation: why is regeneration more rapid in the recipient compared to the donor?. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Surgery, 2009 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12516 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Ibirogba, Sheriff B AB - Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is now well established and performed on a routine basis in many major centres around the world. LDLT is feasible because of the capacity of both the remnant donor liver and the transplanted partial liver to undergo liver regeneration. However it has been demonstrated that liver regeneration in the recipient is rapid, whereas restoration of liver mass in the donor is delayed. This discrepancy in the rate of regeneration could be due to the presence of hepatotrophic factors and the use of immunosuppression in the recipient. The aims of the studies were to determine if hepatotrophic factors and immunosuppression (Cyclosporine) could modify the restoration of the liver mass after partial hepatectomy in rats. DA - 2009 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2009 T1 - A review of living donor liver transplantation: why is regeneration more rapid in the recipient compared to the donor? TI - A review of living donor liver transplantation: why is regeneration more rapid in the recipient compared to the donor? UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12516 ER - en_ZA


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