Subliminal versus supraliminal stimuli activate neural responses in anterior cingulate cortex, fusiform gyrus and insula: a meta-analysis of fMRI studies

 

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dc.contributor.author Meneguzzo, Paolo
dc.contributor.author Tsakiris, Manos
dc.contributor.author Schioth, Helgi B
dc.contributor.author Stein, Dan J
dc.contributor.author Brooks, Samantha J
dc.date.accessioned 2015-02-13T18:06:37Z
dc.date.available 2015-02-13T18:06:37Z
dc.date.issued 2014-12-11
dc.identifier.citation Meneguzzo, P., Tsakiris, M., Schioth, H. B., Stein, D. J., & Brooks, S. J. (2014). Subliminal versus supraliminal stimuli activate neural responses in anterior cingulate cortex, fusiform gyrus and insula: a meta-analysis of fMRI studies. BMC psychology, 2(1), 52. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 2050-7283
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12480
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40359-014-0052-1
dc.description.abstract Background: Non-conscious neural activation may underlie various psychological functions in health and disorder. However, the neural substrates of non-conscious processing have not been entirely elucidated. Examining the differential effects of arousing stimuli that are consciously, versus unconsciously perceived will improve our knowledge of neural circuitry involved in non-conscious perception. Here we conduct preliminary analyses of neural activation in studies that have used both subliminal and supraliminal presentation of the same stimulus. Methods: We use Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) to examine functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies that uniquely present the same stimuli subliminally and supraliminally to healthy participants during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We included a total of 193 foci from 9 studies representing subliminal stimulation and 315 foci from 10 studies representing supraliminal stimulation. Results: The anterior cingulate cortex is significantly activated during both subliminal and supraliminal stimulus presentation. Subliminal stimuli are linked to significantly increased activation in the right fusiform gyrus and right insula. Supraliminal stimuli show significantly increased activation in the left rostral anterior cingulate. Conclusions: Non-conscious processing of arousing stimuli may involve primary visual areas and may also recruit the insula, a brain area involved in eventual interoceptive awareness. The anterior cingulate is perhaps a key brain region for the integration of conscious and non-conscious processing. These preliminary data provide candidate brain regions for further study in to the neural correlates of conscious experience. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source BMC Psychology en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpsychol/
dc.subject.other Subliminal en_ZA
dc.subject.other Supraliminal en_ZA
dc.subject.other Activation Likelihood Estimation en_ZA
dc.subject.other ANterior cingulate cortex en_ZA
dc.subject.other Fusiform gyrus en_ZA
dc.subject.other Cingulate cortex en_ZA
dc.subject.other Insula en_ZA
dc.title Subliminal versus supraliminal stimuli activate neural responses in anterior cingulate cortex, fusiform gyrus and insula: a meta-analysis of fMRI studies en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2015-01-15T17:53:35Z
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.rights.holder Meneguzzo et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Meneguzzo, P., Tsakiris, M., Schioth, H. B., Stein, D. J., & Brooks, S. J. (2014). Subliminal versus supraliminal stimuli activate neural responses in anterior cingulate cortex, fusiform gyrus and insula: a meta-analysis of fMRI studies. <i>BMC Psychology</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12480 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Meneguzzo, Paolo, Manos Tsakiris, Helgi B Schioth, Dan J Stein, and Samantha J Brooks "Subliminal versus supraliminal stimuli activate neural responses in anterior cingulate cortex, fusiform gyrus and insula: a meta-analysis of fMRI studies." <i>BMC Psychology</i> (2014) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12480 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Meneguzzo P, Tsakiris M, Schioth HB, Stein DJ, Brooks SJ. Subliminal versus supraliminal stimuli activate neural responses in anterior cingulate cortex, fusiform gyrus and insula: a meta-analysis of fMRI studies. BMC Psychology. 2014; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12480. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Meneguzzo, Paolo AU - Tsakiris, Manos AU - Schioth, Helgi B AU - Stein, Dan J AU - Brooks, Samantha J AB - Background: Non-conscious neural activation may underlie various psychological functions in health and disorder. However, the neural substrates of non-conscious processing have not been entirely elucidated. Examining the differential effects of arousing stimuli that are consciously, versus unconsciously perceived will improve our knowledge of neural circuitry involved in non-conscious perception. Here we conduct preliminary analyses of neural activation in studies that have used both subliminal and supraliminal presentation of the same stimulus. Methods: We use Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) to examine functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies that uniquely present the same stimuli subliminally and supraliminally to healthy participants during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We included a total of 193 foci from 9 studies representing subliminal stimulation and 315 foci from 10 studies representing supraliminal stimulation. Results: The anterior cingulate cortex is significantly activated during both subliminal and supraliminal stimulus presentation. Subliminal stimuli are linked to significantly increased activation in the right fusiform gyrus and right insula. Supraliminal stimuli show significantly increased activation in the left rostral anterior cingulate. Conclusions: Non-conscious processing of arousing stimuli may involve primary visual areas and may also recruit the insula, a brain area involved in eventual interoceptive awareness. The anterior cingulate is perhaps a key brain region for the integration of conscious and non-conscious processing. These preliminary data provide candidate brain regions for further study in to the neural correlates of conscious experience. DA - 2014-12-11 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/s40359-014-0052-1 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - BMC Psychology LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 SM - 2050-7283 T1 - Subliminal versus supraliminal stimuli activate neural responses in anterior cingulate cortex, fusiform gyrus and insula: a meta-analysis of fMRI studies TI - Subliminal versus supraliminal stimuli activate neural responses in anterior cingulate cortex, fusiform gyrus and insula: a meta-analysis of fMRI studies UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12480 ER - en_ZA


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