People-centred science: strengthening the practice of health policy and systems research

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Sheikh, Kabir
dc.contributor.author George, Asha
dc.contributor.author Gilson, Lucy
dc.date.accessioned 2015-01-17T11:47:37Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-17T11:47:37Z
dc.date.issued 2014-04-17
dc.identifier.citation Health Research Policy and Systems. 2014 Apr 17;12(1):19 en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1478-4505 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12260
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1478-4505-12-19
dc.description.abstract Health policy and systems research (HPSR) is a transdisciplinary field of global importance, with its own emerging standards for creating, evaluating, and utilizing knowledge, and distinguished by a particular orientation towards influencing policy and wider action to strengthen health systems. In this commentary, we argue that the ability of the HPSR field to influence real world change hinges on its becoming more people-centred. We see people-centredness as recognizing the field of enquiry as one of social construction, requiring those conducting HPSR to locate their own position in the system, and conduct and publish research in a manner that foregrounds human agency attributes and values, and is acutely attentive to policy context. Change occurs at many layers of a health system, shaped by social, political, and economic forces, and brought about by different groups of people who make up the system, including service users and communities. The seeds of transformative practice in HPSR lie in amplifying the breadth and depth of dialogue across health system actors in the conduct of research – recognizing that these actors are all generators, sources, and users of knowledge about the system. While building such a dialogic practice, those conducting HPSR must strive to protect the autonomy and integrity of their ideas and actions, and also clearly explain their own positions and the value-basis of their work. We conclude with a set of questions that health policy and systems researchers may wish to consider in making their practice more people-centred, and hence more oriented toward real-world change. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source Health Research Policy and Systems en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.health-policy-systems.com/
dc.subject.other Health policy and systems research en_ZA
dc.subject.other Health systems research en_ZA
dc.subject.other People-centred health systems en_ZA
dc.title People-centred science: strengthening the practice of health policy and systems research en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2015-01-15T17:52:19Z
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.rights.holder Sheikh et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Health Economics Unit en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Sheikh, K., George, A., & Gilson, L. (2014). People-centred science: strengthening the practice of health policy and systems research. <i>Health Research Policy and Systems</i>, http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12260 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Sheikh, Kabir, Asha George, and Lucy Gilson "People-centred science: strengthening the practice of health policy and systems research." <i>Health Research Policy and Systems</i> (2014) http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12260 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Sheikh K, George A, Gilson L. People-centred science: strengthening the practice of health policy and systems research. Health Research Policy and Systems. 2014; http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12260. en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Journal Article AU - Sheikh, Kabir AU - George, Asha AU - Gilson, Lucy AB - Health policy and systems research (HPSR) is a transdisciplinary field of global importance, with its own emerging standards for creating, evaluating, and utilizing knowledge, and distinguished by a particular orientation towards influencing policy and wider action to strengthen health systems. In this commentary, we argue that the ability of the HPSR field to influence real world change hinges on its becoming more people-centred. We see people-centredness as recognizing the field of enquiry as one of social construction, requiring those conducting HPSR to locate their own position in the system, and conduct and publish research in a manner that foregrounds human agency attributes and values, and is acutely attentive to policy context. Change occurs at many layers of a health system, shaped by social, political, and economic forces, and brought about by different groups of people who make up the system, including service users and communities. The seeds of transformative practice in HPSR lie in amplifying the breadth and depth of dialogue across health system actors in the conduct of research – recognizing that these actors are all generators, sources, and users of knowledge about the system. While building such a dialogic practice, those conducting HPSR must strive to protect the autonomy and integrity of their ideas and actions, and also clearly explain their own positions and the value-basis of their work. We conclude with a set of questions that health policy and systems researchers may wish to consider in making their practice more people-centred, and hence more oriented toward real-world change. DA - 2014-04-17 DB - OpenUCT DO - 10.1186/1478-4505-12-19 DP - University of Cape Town J1 - Health Research Policy and Systems LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2014 SM - 1478-4505 T1 - People-centred science: strengthening the practice of health policy and systems research TI - People-centred science: strengthening the practice of health policy and systems research UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12260 ER - en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)