Tracking thicket through space and time : insights into the evolutionary history of the Albany Subtropical Thicket from comparative phylogeography and distribution modelling

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Hedderson, TA en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Cowling, RM en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Potts, Alastair John en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-01-14T07:20:44Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-14T07:20:44Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Potts, A. 2011. Tracking thicket through space and time : insights into the evolutionary history of the Albany Subtropical Thicket from comparative phylogeography and distribution modelling. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12174
dc.description Includes abstract. en_ZA
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 191-219). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Albany Subtropical Thicket (AST) is a species-rich biome restricted to the coastal lowlands of the southern Cape region of South Africa. Its Quaternary history is poorly understood, but climatic changes associated with Pleistocene glacial cycles may have profoundly affected the distributions, gene flows, and demographies of species. The glacial refugia hypothesis predicts that AST retracted into fragmented refugia during glacial cycles. The evolutionarily discrete drainage basin (EDDB) hypothesis suggests that the prevailing topography played an important population-structuring role. I evaluate these two hypotheses by combining community and species distribution models with multigene comparative phylogeography of three AST species Pappea capensis, Nymania capensis, and Schotia afra. Distribution models support the glacial refugia hypothesis, with highly reduced and fragmented distributions postdicted for the Last Glacial Maximum. These models, projected onto two climate scenarios for 2050, give a positive outlook for the future of AST, with no dramatic shifts or reduction in appropriate climate... en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Botany en_ZA
dc.title Tracking thicket through space and time : insights into the evolutionary history of the Albany Subtropical Thicket from comparative phylogeography and distribution modelling en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Potts, A. J. (2011). <i>Tracking thicket through space and time : insights into the evolutionary history of the Albany Subtropical Thicket from comparative phylogeography and distribution modelling</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12174 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Potts, Alastair John. <i>"Tracking thicket through space and time : insights into the evolutionary history of the Albany Subtropical Thicket from comparative phylogeography and distribution modelling."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2011. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12174 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Potts AJ. Tracking thicket through space and time : insights into the evolutionary history of the Albany Subtropical Thicket from comparative phylogeography and distribution modelling. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Department of Biological Sciences, 2011 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12174 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Potts, Alastair John AB - Albany Subtropical Thicket (AST) is a species-rich biome restricted to the coastal lowlands of the southern Cape region of South Africa. Its Quaternary history is poorly understood, but climatic changes associated with Pleistocene glacial cycles may have profoundly affected the distributions, gene flows, and demographies of species. The glacial refugia hypothesis predicts that AST retracted into fragmented refugia during glacial cycles. The evolutionarily discrete drainage basin (EDDB) hypothesis suggests that the prevailing topography played an important population-structuring role. I evaluate these two hypotheses by combining community and species distribution models with multigene comparative phylogeography of three AST species Pappea capensis, Nymania capensis, and Schotia afra. Distribution models support the glacial refugia hypothesis, with highly reduced and fragmented distributions postdicted for the Last Glacial Maximum. These models, projected onto two climate scenarios for 2050, give a positive outlook for the future of AST, with no dramatic shifts or reduction in appropriate climate... DA - 2011 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2011 T1 - Tracking thicket through space and time : insights into the evolutionary history of the Albany Subtropical Thicket from comparative phylogeography and distribution modelling TI - Tracking thicket through space and time : insights into the evolutionary history of the Albany Subtropical Thicket from comparative phylogeography and distribution modelling UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12174 ER - en_ZA


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