Neurobiology, empathy and social cognition: the potential benefits of theatre in traumatised communities

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Barnes, Hazel en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Fleishman, Mark en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Galley, Adrian en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-01-10T13:39:43Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-10T13:39:43Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Galley, A. 2012. Neurobiology, empathy and social cognition: the potential benefits of theatre in traumatised communities. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12004
dc.description Includes abstract. en_ZA
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The ubiquity of technology enables unprecedented contact between people, yet it neglects essential face-to-face communion; e-mail, text-messaging and even social media strip away the metadata of our interpersonal communications; the emotional cues and clues that are a necessary part of everyday social interaction. At the same time, the relentless densification of urban populations enforces proximity among strangers, with routine encounters increasingly bereft of emotional nourishment. The affective numbing that ensues shares many characteristics of post-traumatic stress disorder. The current study explores how exposure to theatre may help to maintain the emotional health of individuals alienated by the stresses of 21st century urban living; moreover, it examines how performance is able to facilitate emotional and social healing in post-conflict communities. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Drama en_ZA
dc.title Neurobiology, empathy and social cognition: the potential benefits of theatre in traumatised communities en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Drama en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Galley, A. (2012). <i>Neurobiology, empathy and social cognition: the potential benefits of theatre in traumatised communities</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12004 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Galley, Adrian. <i>"Neurobiology, empathy and social cognition: the potential benefits of theatre in traumatised communities."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama, 2012. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12004 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Galley A. Neurobiology, empathy and social cognition: the potential benefits of theatre in traumatised communities. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Drama, 2012 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12004 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Galley, Adrian AB - The ubiquity of technology enables unprecedented contact between people, yet it neglects essential face-to-face communion; e-mail, text-messaging and even social media strip away the metadata of our interpersonal communications; the emotional cues and clues that are a necessary part of everyday social interaction. At the same time, the relentless densification of urban populations enforces proximity among strangers, with routine encounters increasingly bereft of emotional nourishment. The affective numbing that ensues shares many characteristics of post-traumatic stress disorder. The current study explores how exposure to theatre may help to maintain the emotional health of individuals alienated by the stresses of 21st century urban living; moreover, it examines how performance is able to facilitate emotional and social healing in post-conflict communities. DA - 2012 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2012 T1 - Neurobiology, empathy and social cognition: the potential benefits of theatre in traumatised communities TI - Neurobiology, empathy and social cognition: the potential benefits of theatre in traumatised communities UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12004 ER - en_ZA


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