Impact of HIV on estimates of child mortality derived using the summary birth history (CEB/CS) Method

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Dorrington, Rob en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Mutemaringa, Themba en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-01-09T09:01:06Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-09T09:01:06Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Mutemaringa, T. 2011. Impact of HIV on estimates of child mortality derived using the summary birth history (CEB/CS) Method. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11843
dc.description.abstract This study investigates the extent of bias in the estimates of infant and under-five mortality derived from the Brass children ever born children surviving (CEB/CS) method as a result of HIV/AIDS. The bias is estimated by comparing the infant and under-five mortality derived from the CEB/CS method with direct estimates from the full birth history data from recent DHS data. The estimates from the full birth history data have been corrected for bias due to HIV/AIDS using the method used by IGME. IMRs and U5MRs derived from data from women aged 25-39 were underestimated by up to 15% in the six countries studied. Estimates of bias in data derived from women aged 20-24 differed between countries. The results from these younger women could be affected by differences between the indirect and direct methods of estimation. In two of the countries, estimates of overall bias of more than 30% were observed. The bulk of the overall bias is due to the effect of HIV on the survival of mothers and their children. The choice of model life table does not introduce much bias, especially in estimates of under-five mortality where the absolute bias in most countries was less than 3%. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Demography en_ZA
dc.title Impact of HIV on estimates of child mortality derived using the summary birth history (CEB/CS) Method en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Centre for Actuarial Research (CARE) en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPhil en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Mutemaringa, T. (2011). <i>Impact of HIV on estimates of child mortality derived using the summary birth history (CEB/CS) Method</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,Centre for Actuarial Research (CARE). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11843 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Mutemaringa, Themba. <i>"Impact of HIV on estimates of child mortality derived using the summary birth history (CEB/CS) Method."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,Centre for Actuarial Research (CARE), 2011. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11843 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Mutemaringa T. Impact of HIV on estimates of child mortality derived using the summary birth history (CEB/CS) Method. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Commerce ,Centre for Actuarial Research (CARE), 2011 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11843 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Mutemaringa, Themba AB - This study investigates the extent of bias in the estimates of infant and under-five mortality derived from the Brass children ever born children surviving (CEB/CS) method as a result of HIV/AIDS. The bias is estimated by comparing the infant and under-five mortality derived from the CEB/CS method with direct estimates from the full birth history data from recent DHS data. The estimates from the full birth history data have been corrected for bias due to HIV/AIDS using the method used by IGME. IMRs and U5MRs derived from data from women aged 25-39 were underestimated by up to 15% in the six countries studied. Estimates of bias in data derived from women aged 20-24 differed between countries. The results from these younger women could be affected by differences between the indirect and direct methods of estimation. In two of the countries, estimates of overall bias of more than 30% were observed. The bulk of the overall bias is due to the effect of HIV on the survival of mothers and their children. The choice of model life table does not introduce much bias, especially in estimates of under-five mortality where the absolute bias in most countries was less than 3%. DA - 2011 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2011 T1 - Impact of HIV on estimates of child mortality derived using the summary birth history (CEB/CS) Method TI - Impact of HIV on estimates of child mortality derived using the summary birth history (CEB/CS) Method UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11843 ER - en_ZA


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