Relationships between psychosocial stress, cortisol, apolipoprotein є4, beta-amyloid, hippocampal volumes and Alzheimer's disease in a sample of South African older adults

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Thomas, Kevin en_ZA
dc.contributor.author James, Katharine Ann en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-01-08T20:02:22Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-08T20:02:22Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation James, K. 2013. Relationships between psychosocial stress, cortisol, apolipoprotein є4, beta-amyloid, hippocampal volumes and Alzheimer's disease in a sample of South African older adults. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11796
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Many factors contribute to age-related changes in cognitive functioning. There is no single defined profile of factors that is clearly associated with the presence, or rate of progression, of cognitive changes in older adults. Stress, both psychosocial and physiological, may play a role. Aims: The general aim of this study was to explore the relationships between cognitive functioning and cognitive decline, on the one hand, and psychosocial and physiological stress, as well as a range of sociodemographic, psychosocial and physiological factors, on the other, in older adults with a range of cognitive function including healthy and impaired. Methods: Both cross-sectional (Study 1) and longitudinal (Study 2) designs addressed these aims. Study 1 examined the contribution of stress and sociodemographic, psychosocial, and physiological factors to cognition. Participants were 69 cognitively healthy older adults and 65 possible or probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. They were all over the age of 60 and resided in the greater Cape Town metropolitan region of South Africa. Cognitive functioning was assessed using a battery of neuropsychological tests. Salivary cortisol levels, apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, and plasma beta-amyloid levels were determined at baseline. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Philosophy en_ZA
dc.title Relationships between psychosocial stress, cortisol, apolipoprotein є4, beta-amyloid, hippocampal volumes and Alzheimer's disease in a sample of South African older adults en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation James, K. A. (2013). <i>Relationships between psychosocial stress, cortisol, apolipoprotein &#1108;4, beta-amyloid, hippocampal volumes and Alzheimer's disease in a sample of South African older adults</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11796 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation James, Katharine Ann. <i>"Relationships between psychosocial stress, cortisol, apolipoprotein &#1108;4, beta-amyloid, hippocampal volumes and Alzheimer's disease in a sample of South African older adults."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11796 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation James KA. Relationships between psychosocial stress, cortisol, apolipoprotein &#1108;4, beta-amyloid, hippocampal volumes and Alzheimer's disease in a sample of South African older adults. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2013 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11796 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - James, Katharine Ann AB - Many factors contribute to age-related changes in cognitive functioning. There is no single defined profile of factors that is clearly associated with the presence, or rate of progression, of cognitive changes in older adults. Stress, both psychosocial and physiological, may play a role. Aims: The general aim of this study was to explore the relationships between cognitive functioning and cognitive decline, on the one hand, and psychosocial and physiological stress, as well as a range of sociodemographic, psychosocial and physiological factors, on the other, in older adults with a range of cognitive function including healthy and impaired. Methods: Both cross-sectional (Study 1) and longitudinal (Study 2) designs addressed these aims. Study 1 examined the contribution of stress and sociodemographic, psychosocial, and physiological factors to cognition. Participants were 69 cognitively healthy older adults and 65 possible or probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. They were all over the age of 60 and resided in the greater Cape Town metropolitan region of South Africa. Cognitive functioning was assessed using a battery of neuropsychological tests. Salivary cortisol levels, apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, and plasma beta-amyloid levels were determined at baseline. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Relationships between psychosocial stress, cortisol, apolipoprotein &#1108;4, beta-amyloid, hippocampal volumes and Alzheimer's disease in a sample of South African older adults TI - Relationships between psychosocial stress, cortisol, apolipoprotein &#1108;4, beta-amyloid, hippocampal volumes and Alzheimer's disease in a sample of South African older adults UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11796 ER - en_ZA


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