Sam Sly's African Journal and the role of satire in colonial British identity at the Cape of Good Hope, c. 1840-1850

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Penn, Nigel en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Holdridge, Christopher Arthur en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-01-06T12:06:22Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-06T12:06:22Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Holdridge, C. 2010. Sam Sly's African Journal and the role of satire in colonial British identity at the Cape of Good Hope, c. 1840-1850. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11558
dc.description Includes abstract. en_ZA
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 161-171). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract In 1843, William Sammons founded the peculiarly named Sam Sly’s African Journal (1843 -1851) in Cape Town. Claiming to be a ‘register of facts, fiction, news, literature, commerce and amusement’, the African Journal was a hybrid newspaper and literary and satirical periodical aimed at an Anglophone immigrant readership in the period between the abolition of slavery and the granting of representative government to the Cape Colony. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.title Sam Sly's African Journal and the role of satire in colonial British identity at the Cape of Good Hope, c. 1840-1850 en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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