Dreaming in Urbach-Wiethe patients the effect of amygdala damage on dreaming

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Solms, Mark en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Koopowitz, Sheri en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-01-04T14:41:30Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-04T14:41:30Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Koopowitz, S. 2012. Dreaming in Urbach-Wiethe patients the effect of amygdala damage on dreaming. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11293
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract As it stands, there is a paucity of literature looking at the effect of damaged amygdalae on dreaming and dream content. Of the many functions, the amygdala is heavily involved in processing emotional stimuli and fear conditioning. In Revonsuo’s threat simulation theory (TST), the amygdala plays an important role in the threat simulation mechanism. This mechanism evaluates the threatening situation, then chooses and executes the avoidant type behaviour to successfully avoid the potential threat. All of this is done in the dream world to ensure that humans have a safe virtual environment in which to practice these responses. To test this theory, a sample of people without a functioning amygdala was needed. Unfortunately, bilateral amygdala lesions are extremely rare in the human population. Urbach-Wiethe disease (UWD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder that presents with characteristic amygdala calcifications. A sample of 8 UWD patients and 8 matched controls (all females) from the Northern Cape in South Africa were used. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Psychology en_ZA
dc.title Dreaming in Urbach-Wiethe patients the effect of amygdala damage on dreaming en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MSocSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Koopowitz, S. (2012). <i>Dreaming in Urbach-Wiethe patients the effect of amygdala damage on dreaming</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11293 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Koopowitz, Sheri. <i>"Dreaming in Urbach-Wiethe patients the effect of amygdala damage on dreaming."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2012. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11293 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Koopowitz S. Dreaming in Urbach-Wiethe patients the effect of amygdala damage on dreaming. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Psychology, 2012 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11293 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Koopowitz, Sheri AB - As it stands, there is a paucity of literature looking at the effect of damaged amygdalae on dreaming and dream content. Of the many functions, the amygdala is heavily involved in processing emotional stimuli and fear conditioning. In Revonsuo’s threat simulation theory (TST), the amygdala plays an important role in the threat simulation mechanism. This mechanism evaluates the threatening situation, then chooses and executes the avoidant type behaviour to successfully avoid the potential threat. All of this is done in the dream world to ensure that humans have a safe virtual environment in which to practice these responses. To test this theory, a sample of people without a functioning amygdala was needed. Unfortunately, bilateral amygdala lesions are extremely rare in the human population. Urbach-Wiethe disease (UWD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder that presents with characteristic amygdala calcifications. A sample of 8 UWD patients and 8 matched controls (all females) from the Northern Cape in South Africa were used. DA - 2012 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2012 T1 - Dreaming in Urbach-Wiethe patients the effect of amygdala damage on dreaming TI - Dreaming in Urbach-Wiethe patients the effect of amygdala damage on dreaming UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11293 ER - en_ZA


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