An evaluation of the access to public health care for diabetic patients in Zimbabwe

 

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dc.contributor.advisor McIntyre, Di en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Masuka, Pardon en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-12-31T19:53:56Z
dc.date.available 2014-12-31T19:53:56Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Masuka, P. 2008. An evaluation of the access to public health care for diabetic patients in Zimbabwe. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10753
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 118-127). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Zimbabwe is facing very serious economic challenges including hyperinflation, poor international relations, scarce foreign currency and a crumbling infrastructure. This situation has adversely affected all sectors of the economy, including health care. Resources for health care have significantly dwindled and the population's disposable incomes are very low. However, the burden of disease due to HIV/AIDS, TB, Malaria and Diabetes is increasing unabated. Thus, the current study seeks to determine whether public sector diabetes care services are available, affordable, acceptable and also whether access to care is equitable or not. A cross sectional design was adopted for this study. Questionnaires were administered to 179 patients who presented at public health facilities in Harare, 15 provider interviews were done, 15 health facility checklists were completed, one Provincial Medical Director completed a questionnaire and three focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted. Purposive sampling was used for key informant interviews (PMDs) and also, in the selection of FGD participants. For provider interviews, nurses who attended to Diabetics were selected as respondents. All Diabetic patients who presented for care at selected health facilities were interviewed. The study also conveniently selected 10 facilities from high density areas, three from the medium and two from the low density areas for checklists. Study findings show that the major challenges lie with availability and affordability of care. In summary, there is a shortage of resources such as staff, drugs, equipment and supplies. Patients also face high direct and indirect costs of care due to high drug, food and transport costs. Membership of medical aid seems to be restricted to the richest patients. Moreover, poorest the patients do not belong to any support groups. However, the interaction between patients and their providers is reported to be good. There is a high level of trust between patients and their providers and in addition, patients affirm that providers respect the principle of confidentiality. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Public Health en_ZA
dc.title An evaluation of the access to public health care for diabetic patients in Zimbabwe en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Public Health and Family Medicine en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MPH en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Masuka, P. (2008). <i>An evaluation of the access to public health care for diabetic patients in Zimbabwe</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Public Health and Family Medicine. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10753 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Masuka, Pardon. <i>"An evaluation of the access to public health care for diabetic patients in Zimbabwe."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Public Health and Family Medicine, 2008. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10753 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Masuka P. An evaluation of the access to public health care for diabetic patients in Zimbabwe. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Public Health and Family Medicine, 2008 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10753 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Masuka, Pardon AB - Zimbabwe is facing very serious economic challenges including hyperinflation, poor international relations, scarce foreign currency and a crumbling infrastructure. This situation has adversely affected all sectors of the economy, including health care. Resources for health care have significantly dwindled and the population's disposable incomes are very low. However, the burden of disease due to HIV/AIDS, TB, Malaria and Diabetes is increasing unabated. Thus, the current study seeks to determine whether public sector diabetes care services are available, affordable, acceptable and also whether access to care is equitable or not. A cross sectional design was adopted for this study. Questionnaires were administered to 179 patients who presented at public health facilities in Harare, 15 provider interviews were done, 15 health facility checklists were completed, one Provincial Medical Director completed a questionnaire and three focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted. Purposive sampling was used for key informant interviews (PMDs) and also, in the selection of FGD participants. For provider interviews, nurses who attended to Diabetics were selected as respondents. All Diabetic patients who presented for care at selected health facilities were interviewed. The study also conveniently selected 10 facilities from high density areas, three from the medium and two from the low density areas for checklists. Study findings show that the major challenges lie with availability and affordability of care. In summary, there is a shortage of resources such as staff, drugs, equipment and supplies. Patients also face high direct and indirect costs of care due to high drug, food and transport costs. Membership of medical aid seems to be restricted to the richest patients. Moreover, poorest the patients do not belong to any support groups. However, the interaction between patients and their providers is reported to be good. There is a high level of trust between patients and their providers and in addition, patients affirm that providers respect the principle of confidentiality. DA - 2008 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2008 T1 - An evaluation of the access to public health care for diabetic patients in Zimbabwe TI - An evaluation of the access to public health care for diabetic patients in Zimbabwe UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10753 ER - en_ZA


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