Bacterial meningitis in neonates and children South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Levin, M en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Thomas, Karla Mari en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-12-31T19:52:48Z
dc.date.available 2014-12-31T19:52:48Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Thomas, K. 2013. Bacterial meningitis in neonates and children South Africa. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10743
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Acute bacterial meningitis is defined as the inflammation of the meninges. It is caused by various bacteria and the specific aetiology is age dependant. In the neonatal period the causative organisms are: Group B streptococci, Gram - negative bacilli (e.g.: E. coli, Klebsiella spp, Enterobacter spp, Salmonella spp) and Listeria monocytogenes. In infants and children up to the age of 5 the most common causative organisms include: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib)and Neiseria meningitidis. The two chief causes of bacterial meningitis in children older than 5 are S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis. Various studies have been performed to look at the profile of meningitis among the paediatric population. Objective: To investigate the aetiology of acute bacterial meningitis in South African newborns and children from 2005 - 2010. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Paediatrics en_ZA
dc.title Bacterial meningitis in neonates and children South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Master Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Paediatrics and Child Health en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters
dc.type.qualificationname MMed en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Thomas, K. M. (2013). <i>Bacterial meningitis in neonates and children South Africa</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Paediatrics and Child Health. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10743 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Thomas, Karla Mari. <i>"Bacterial meningitis in neonates and children South Africa."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10743 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Thomas KM. Bacterial meningitis in neonates and children South Africa. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Health Sciences ,Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, 2013 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10743 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Thomas, Karla Mari AB - Acute bacterial meningitis is defined as the inflammation of the meninges. It is caused by various bacteria and the specific aetiology is age dependant. In the neonatal period the causative organisms are: Group B streptococci, Gram - negative bacilli (e.g.: E. coli, Klebsiella spp, Enterobacter spp, Salmonella spp) and Listeria monocytogenes. In infants and children up to the age of 5 the most common causative organisms include: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib)and Neiseria meningitidis. The two chief causes of bacterial meningitis in children older than 5 are S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis. Various studies have been performed to look at the profile of meningitis among the paediatric population. Objective: To investigate the aetiology of acute bacterial meningitis in South African newborns and children from 2005 - 2010. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Bacterial meningitis in neonates and children South Africa TI - Bacterial meningitis in neonates and children South Africa UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10743 ER - en_ZA


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