The relevance of non-legal technical and scientific concepts in the interpretation and application of the law of the sea : an analysis of the United Nations convention on the law of the sea

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Devine, D en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Guy, Neil Raymond en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-12-30T06:40:21Z
dc.date.available 2014-12-30T06:40:21Z
dc.date.issued 2000 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Guy, N. 2000. The relevance of non-legal technical and scientific concepts in the interpretation and application of the law of the sea : an analysis of the United Nations convention on the law of the sea. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10515
dc.description Bibliography: p. 363-375. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Of necessity LOSC Articles are brief and in some instances vague and requiring interpretation. There is general consensus that LOSC is successful and that its vagueness in certain areas is an asset allowing a variety of otherwise contrary attitudes to be accommodated. 1 It is necessary to analyse the Articles with a view to a better understanding of them and to possibly prepare for some future conference or convention that will more than likely be necessary to resolve some of the remaining problems. To illustrate the need for greater understanding of some of the Articles of LOSC the United Nations Office for Ocean Affairs and Law of the Sea found it necessary to convene a conference of 'experts' during 1993 and 1995 to consider the implications of the complex Articles of LOSC which deal with claims to the continental shelf. Criteria contained in Article 76 allowing for maximum outer limits of the continental shelf and other criteria to justify a claim are complicated and require experience in many fields including marine geology, geography, surveying, and geodesy.2 The intention is therefore to analyse the possible interpretation, application and consequences of the implementation of Articles in LOSC, and more particularly in a Southern African context. Provisions of LOSC, where technical and scientific considerations are crucial, will be selected for consideration. These include those involving geodetic, geographical, geological, survey, navigational, organisational, and social and resource factors. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Law en_ZA
dc.title The relevance of non-legal technical and scientific concepts in the interpretation and application of the law of the sea : an analysis of the United Nations convention on the law of the sea en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Law en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Institute of Marine and Environmental Law en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Guy, N. R. (2000). <i>The relevance of non-legal technical and scientific concepts in the interpretation and application of the law of the sea : an analysis of the United Nations convention on the law of the sea</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Law ,Institute of Marine and Environmental Law. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10515 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Guy, Neil Raymond. <i>"The relevance of non-legal technical and scientific concepts in the interpretation and application of the law of the sea : an analysis of the United Nations convention on the law of the sea."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Law ,Institute of Marine and Environmental Law, 2000. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10515 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Guy NR. The relevance of non-legal technical and scientific concepts in the interpretation and application of the law of the sea : an analysis of the United Nations convention on the law of the sea. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Law ,Institute of Marine and Environmental Law, 2000 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10515 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Guy, Neil Raymond AB - Of necessity LOSC Articles are brief and in some instances vague and requiring interpretation. There is general consensus that LOSC is successful and that its vagueness in certain areas is an asset allowing a variety of otherwise contrary attitudes to be accommodated. 1 It is necessary to analyse the Articles with a view to a better understanding of them and to possibly prepare for some future conference or convention that will more than likely be necessary to resolve some of the remaining problems. To illustrate the need for greater understanding of some of the Articles of LOSC the United Nations Office for Ocean Affairs and Law of the Sea found it necessary to convene a conference of 'experts' during 1993 and 1995 to consider the implications of the complex Articles of LOSC which deal with claims to the continental shelf. Criteria contained in Article 76 allowing for maximum outer limits of the continental shelf and other criteria to justify a claim are complicated and require experience in many fields including marine geology, geography, surveying, and geodesy.2 The intention is therefore to analyse the possible interpretation, application and consequences of the implementation of Articles in LOSC, and more particularly in a Southern African context. Provisions of LOSC, where technical and scientific considerations are crucial, will be selected for consideration. These include those involving geodetic, geographical, geological, survey, navigational, organisational, and social and resource factors. DA - 2000 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2000 T1 - The relevance of non-legal technical and scientific concepts in the interpretation and application of the law of the sea : an analysis of the United Nations convention on the law of the sea TI - The relevance of non-legal technical and scientific concepts in the interpretation and application of the law of the sea : an analysis of the United Nations convention on the law of the sea UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10515 ER - en_ZA


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