Recovering the lives of South African Jewish women during the migration years c1880-1939

 

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dc.contributor.author Belling, Veronica en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-12-25T15:56:41Z
dc.date.available 2014-12-25T15:56:41Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Belling, V. 2013. Recovering the lives of South African Jewish women during the migration years c1880-1939. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10013
dc.description Includes abstract. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This dissertation sets out to demonstrate how a group doubly situated on the margins, as Jewish and female, helped to build the larger community of South African Jewry and contributed to the wider South African society. The investigation is rooted in the transformation wrought in Jewish communities worldwide in the nineteenth and twentieth century through emancipation, assimilation, immigration, acculturation, and Zionism. The discussion is divided into three sections, of which the first two constitute a description of the normative experience of Jewish women, the majority of whom were first and second generation immigrants from eastern Europe. Entitled "Setting up house", the first section opens with their migration, their establishment of immigrant neighbourhoods, and the perpetuation of their close knit communities through bonds of marriage. Entitled "Beyond hearth and home", the second section explores how the period, 1880- 1939, that witnessed dramatic changes in women's status worldwide - through education, the workplace and the attainment of the vote - resonated among South African Jewish women. It will show that while pursuing a career beyond marriage was exceptional, participation on the Jewish communal scene, whether in the welfare societies or in the Zionist movement was normative, and by the end of the period women had wrested control of their organisations from the men. In contrast to the normative experiences described in the first two sections, the third section, "Varieties of integration: case studies of extraordinary women", that is divided between the fields of "Politics" and "Culture", compares and contrasts the lives of women, who by virtue of education, career, lifestyle, political or cultural orientation, did not conform to the norm. These female iconoclasts accentuate what is considered to be normative in the South African Jewish community, whether it be the traditional family, the identification with the English language community, or passive conformity to the existing racial status quo. The dissertation will show that these idealistic and driven women were frequently the most far sighted, and their contributions to the political and cultural life of South Africa in retrospect, take on much greater significance. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.title Recovering the lives of South African Jewish women during the migration years c1880-1939 en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Historical Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Belling, V. (2013). <i>Recovering the lives of South African Jewish women during the migration years c1880-1939</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Belling, Veronica. <i>"Recovering the lives of South African Jewish women during the migration years c1880-1939."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Belling V. Recovering the lives of South African Jewish women during the migration years c1880-1939. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Humanities ,Department of Historical Studies, 2013 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Belling, Veronica AB - This dissertation sets out to demonstrate how a group doubly situated on the margins, as Jewish and female, helped to build the larger community of South African Jewry and contributed to the wider South African society. The investigation is rooted in the transformation wrought in Jewish communities worldwide in the nineteenth and twentieth century through emancipation, assimilation, immigration, acculturation, and Zionism. The discussion is divided into three sections, of which the first two constitute a description of the normative experience of Jewish women, the majority of whom were first and second generation immigrants from eastern Europe. Entitled "Setting up house", the first section opens with their migration, their establishment of immigrant neighbourhoods, and the perpetuation of their close knit communities through bonds of marriage. Entitled "Beyond hearth and home", the second section explores how the period, 1880- 1939, that witnessed dramatic changes in women's status worldwide - through education, the workplace and the attainment of the vote - resonated among South African Jewish women. It will show that while pursuing a career beyond marriage was exceptional, participation on the Jewish communal scene, whether in the welfare societies or in the Zionist movement was normative, and by the end of the period women had wrested control of their organisations from the men. In contrast to the normative experiences described in the first two sections, the third section, "Varieties of integration: case studies of extraordinary women", that is divided between the fields of "Politics" and "Culture", compares and contrasts the lives of women, who by virtue of education, career, lifestyle, political or cultural orientation, did not conform to the norm. These female iconoclasts accentuate what is considered to be normative in the South African Jewish community, whether it be the traditional family, the identification with the English language community, or passive conformity to the existing racial status quo. The dissertation will show that these idealistic and driven women were frequently the most far sighted, and their contributions to the political and cultural life of South Africa in retrospect, take on much greater significance. DA - 2013 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2013 T1 - Recovering the lives of South African Jewish women during the migration years c1880-1939 TI - Recovering the lives of South African Jewish women during the migration years c1880-1939 UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/10013 ER - en_ZA


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