Different dimensions of HIV-related stigma may have opposite effects on HIV testing: Evidence among young men and women in South Africa

 

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dc.creator Maughan-Brown, Brendan
dc.creator Nyblade, Laura
dc.date 2014-06-04T12:57:37Z
dc.date 2014-06-04T12:57:37Z
dc.date 2014
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-28T10:06:37Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-28T10:06:37Z
dc.date.issued 2015-05-28
dc.identifier Maughan-Brown, B., Nyblade, L. (2014). Different dimensions of HIV-related stigma may have opposite effects on HIV testing: Evidence among young men and women in South Africa. AIDS and Behavior, 18 (5):958-965.
dc.identifier http://www.rti.org/publications/abstract.cfm?pubid=21702
dc.identifier http://hdl.handle.net/11090/704
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11090/704
dc.description Although HIV-related stigma in general is known to deter HIV-testing, the extent to which different dimensions of stigma independently influence testing behaviour is poorly understood. We used data on young black men (n = 553) and women (n = 674) from the 2009 Cape Area Panel Study to examine the independent effects of stigmatising attitudes, perceived stigma and observed enacted stigma on HIV-testing. Multivariate logistic regression models showed that stigma had a strong relationship with HIV-testing among women, but not men. Women who held stigmatising attitudes were more likely to have been tested (OR 3, p < 0.01), while perceived stigma (OR 0.61, p < 0.1) and observed enacted stigma (OR 0.42, p < 0.01) reduced the odds significantly of women having had an HIV test. Our findings highlight that different dimensions of stigma may have opposite effects on HIV testing, and point towards the need for interventions that limit the impact of enacted and perceived stigma on HIV-testing among women.
dc.language en
dc.publisher AIDS and Behaviour
dc.subject HIV/AIDS
dc.subject South Africa
dc.subject Stigma
dc.subject CAPS
dc.subject HIV-testing
dc.title Different dimensions of HIV-related stigma may have opposite effects on HIV testing: Evidence among young men and women in South Africa
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department SALDRU en_ZA


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