Energy in east and southern Africa : with special reference to South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Dutkiewicz, Ryszard Karol en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Gielink, Michael Ian en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-10-11T11:53:53Z
dc.date.available 2014-10-11T11:53:53Z
dc.date.issued 1992 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Gielink, M. 1992. Energy in east and southern Africa : with special reference to South Africa. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8287
dc.description Bibliography: leaves 168-173. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract In this thesis the energy sector of the East and Southern Africa Region (as defined by the World Energy Council) is investigated. Special attention is given to South Africa and the potential future role she could play in the region. The region is characterized by large population growth rates, insufficient economic growth, political and civil instability, massive urbanization, high illiteracy rates, a low level of development, a lack of finance and foreign exchange, and inadequate institutional structures, all of which effect the energy sector making the provision of a sustainable and adequate supply of energy difficult. On the other hand, South Africa, the economic giant of the region, has a sophisticated and well established energy infrastructure and•has the potential to play a large role in the energy sector of the region. A large portion of the region's energy demand is supplied by traditional energy sources and is consumed by the domestic sector. In many countries of the region, energy demand exceeds sustainable supply, resulting in energy scarcities and increased deforestation. These issues need to be addressed as a priority. Reforestation based on agro- forestry, was identified as the option most likely to succeed in this regard. Although commercial energy resources are abundant within the region, they are largely unexploited as a result of the lack of suitably large markets, vast distances, a lack of finance and regional instability. The promotion of the utilization of these resources, which would ease supply constraints, is reliant on regional cooperation and the trade in energy. Forecasts of future energy consumption in the region indicate that unless present constraints on the energy sector are alleviated, the adequate supply of energy, and in particular traditional energy, will be jeopardized. It is proposed that any long-term cost-effective solution for the provision of an adequate and sustainable supply of energy requires regional political stability and cooperation, institutional reform, the integration of traditional and commercial energy structures, and should address the issues of deforestation and population growth. en_ZA
dc.subject.other Energy and Development Studies en_ZA
dc.title Energy in east and southern Africa : with special reference to South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Engineering & the Built Environment en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Energy Research Centre en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
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