Maize Streak Virus: diversity and virulence

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Rybicki, Ed en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Martin, Darren Patrick en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-22T10:35:33Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-22T10:35:33Z
dc.date.issued 2000 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Martin, D. 2000. Maize Streak Virus: diversity and virulence. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/6667
dc.description.abstract Zea mays was first introduced to Africa in Ghana by Portuguese traders in the 16th century. The steady spread of maize cultivation since then has made it the most important cereal crop in Africa today. Whereas improved maize genotypes and agricultural techniques enable yearly yields above 10 tons hectare-1 in the developed world, yearly yields across Africa have remained low at about 1 ton hectare-1 in most countries. Although outmoded agricultural practices are the main reason for poor yields, maize pathogens inflict substantial additional losses. Of the many pathogens currently confronting maize farmers in Africa, Maize streak virus (MSV) is the most significant. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.title Maize Streak Virus: diversity and virulence en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Molecular and Cell Biology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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