E-health, social media and the law in South Africa can ethical concerns in e-health practice be addressed through regulation?

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Ncube, Caroline en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Townsend, Beverley Alice en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2014-07-30T18:21:15Z
dc.date.available 2014-07-30T18:21:15Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Townsend, B. 2013. E-health, social media and the law in South Africa can ethical concerns in e-health practice be addressed through regulation?. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/4741
dc.description Includes abstract.
dc.description.abstract This dissertation explores the various legal and ethical difficulties faced by health practitioners and patients alike in the application and practice of ehealth. These include informed consent, the relationship between the doctor and patient, accuracy of online content, confidentiality, privacy, data security and licensure. The existing and proposed legislation in place in South Africa and internationally to potentially address these issues is discussed. The broader question that is posed is whether greater e-health regulation is required in a developing country such as South Africa and if so what the regulations should address. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Law en_ZA
dc.title E-health, social media and the law in South Africa can ethical concerns in e-health practice be addressed through regulation? en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Law en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Public Law en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname LLM en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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