The meaning of institutional independence in Van Rooyen v the state

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dc.contributor.author Franco, Jane
dc.contributor.author Powell, Cathy
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-13T14:27:45Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-13T14:27:45Z
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.citation Franco, J., & Powell, C. (2004). The meaning of institutional independence in Van Rooyen v The State: notes. South African Law Journal, 121(3), p-562.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/27565
dc.description.abstract In Van Rooyen & Others v The State & Others (General Council of the Bar Intervening) 2002 (5) SA 246 (CC) (hereinafter referred to as Van Rooyen (CC)),the Constitutional Court found that magistrates’ courts are sufficiently independent largely because the High Courts are able to protect the lower courts from executive interference through the mechanism of judicial review. Apart from providing an overview of the case as a whole, this note analyses the Constitutional Court’s reliance on judicial review in detail, suggesting that the central role accorded to judicial review betrays an inadequate theoretical conception of institutional independence.
dc.source South African Law Journal
dc.source.uri https://juta.co.za/law/products/3601-south-african-law-journal/
dc.title The meaning of institutional independence in Van Rooyen v the state
dc.type Journal Article
dc.date.updated 2016-01-15T09:47:42Z
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Law
dc.publisher.department Public Law
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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