Knowledge and attitudes of undergraduate nurses towards organ donation and transplantation in a selected campus of a college in the Eastern Cape

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Fouché, Nicola A en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Mayers, Pat en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Gidimisana, Nozibele Dorothy en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-11T10:18:40Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-11T10:18:40Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Gidimisana, N. 2016. Knowledge and attitudes of undergraduate nurses towards organ donation and transplantation in a selected campus of a college in the Eastern Cape. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/21189
dc.description.abstract South Africa has a low organ donation and transplantation rate despite the availability of medical professionals with the expertise to perform such transplants. This can be attributed to various factors, such as knowledge and attitudes towards organ donation and transplantation. Despite the efforts of the Organ Donor Foundation in South Africa by conducting awareness and education campaigns organ donation rates remains low. There is a wide discrepancy in the rate of organ donation among the different ethnic groups in the country, perhaps due to a lack of knowledge or for cultural or religious reasons. Nurses, as health-care providers, have an important role to play in enabling patients and families to deal with the topic of organ donation. This cross-sectional study investigated the knowledge and attitudes of 268 pre-registration nursing students towards organ donation, at a nursing college in Mthatha, using an anonymous, self- administered questionnaire for data collection. A stratified convenient sampling method was used. The data was captured and analysed using the SPSS statistical package, Version 21; thereafter, descriptive and cross-tabulation analyses were performed on the data. Results: The majority of respondents (62.8%) were aware of organ donation with a small number (1.6%) registered as organ donors. Ethnicity and religion did not influence an individual's decision to donate his/her organs, which suggested that the decision was a personal one. There was no association between age group and willingness to donate a kidney to a relative, although younger respondents were willing to donate kidneys as living donors. There was also no clear relationship between gender and willingness to donate an organ (p-values of 0.03). Knowledge about organ donation was seen as a strong predictor of the attitudes towards organ donation. The majority of respondents were willing to donate organs for transplantation to save the lives of others. It is highly recommended from the results of the study that awareness campaigns to promote organ donation using various strategies and emphasising altruistic motives can increase the organs for donation. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Nursing en_ZA
dc.subject.other Organ donation en_ZA
dc.subject.other transplantation en_ZA
dc.subject.other attitudes en_ZA
dc.subject.other student nurses en_ZA
dc.subject.other South Africa en_ZA
dc.title Knowledge and attitudes of undergraduate nurses towards organ donation and transplantation in a selected campus of a college in the Eastern Cape en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Division of Nursing and Midwifery en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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