Antiviral therapy in herpes virus infections

 

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dc.contributor.author Maartens, Gary
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-07T08:01:04Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-07T08:01:04Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier.citation Maartens, G. (2003). Antiviral therapy in herpesvirus infections. Continuing Medical Education, 21(6). en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/20243
dc.description.abstract Herpes viruses are large, enveloped DNA viruses. There are currently 8 known human herpes viruses and 1 primate species that is a rare human pathogen. Most people have been infected with several human herpes viruses. In immunocompetent individuals primary infections with herpes viruses are generally mild, self-limiting infections. After primary infection, herpes viruses remain latent in either sensory nerve ganglia or immune cells. Latency may persist indefinitely unless immune suppression develops, in which case recurrent disease can become life threatening. In the immunocompetent patient, clinical recurrences that are milder than the primary infection are the hallmark of herpes virus infections. en_ZA
dc.language eng en_ZA
dc.publisher Health and Medical Publishing Group en_ZA
dc.rights Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ en_ZA
dc.source South African Journal for Continuing Medical Education en_ZA
dc.source.uri http://www.cmej.org.za/index.php/cmej
dc.subject antiviral therapy
dc.subject herpes-virus infections
dc.title Antiviral therapy in herpes virus infections en_ZA
dc.type Journal Article en_ZA
dc.date.updated 2015-12-24T09:01:20Z
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Article en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Health Sciences en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Medicine en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)