Counter-transference phenomena in the white clinician : a hermeneutic investigation of cross-racial psychotherapy in South Africa

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Foster, Don en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Friedman, Graeme Ross en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-15T07:12:23Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-15T07:12:23Z
dc.date.issued 1985 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Friedman, G. 1985. Counter-transference phenomena in the white clinician : a hermeneutic investigation of cross-racial psychotherapy in South Africa. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/17017
dc.description Bibliography: pages 146-155. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This is a psychodynamic study of the white clinician's countertransference in cross-racial psychotherapy. Available evidence indicates that racial conflicts, despite their salience in South Africa, are rarely addressed in psychotherapy practice, training or research. The research that has been conducted is reviewed and the limitations of the natural scientific paradigm are discussed. Hermeneutics - the art of interpretation - is presented as a more appropriate methodology for the study of human beings. The researcher conducted one unstructured interview with each of seven 'liberal', white therapists (six clinical psychologist, three of each sex, and one female psychiatric social worker) regarding their experience of cross-racial psychotherapy. The interview protocols are reflected upon and the common themes explicated and described. Three primary themes emerge, regarding, amongst other phenomena, the participants' feelings of 'white guilt' and their inhibition of the expression of 'black anger', feelings of helplessness and sexual conflicts. General defensive approaches adopted by the clinicians include the use of their professional role and of patient characteristics, the adoption of directive approaches and the practice of overcompensation. Defence mechanisms employed include those of intellectualisation, displacement, denial, rationalisation and projection. The need to make reparation is pervasive. A Kleinian analysis of 'white guilt' is presented and the researcher's role as interviewer is reflected upon. Implications of the results for practice, training and research are discussed. Amongst these are the need for formal training and self-reflection, suggestions with regard to attuning oneself to countertransference and with regard to the handling of cross-racial therapy, the presentation of research possibilities and a discussion regarding the clinician's political role. It is concluded that, in many cases, cross-racial psychotherapy can be effective and that the chances of its success are enhanced by the tackling of counter-transference and other racial barriers. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Clinical Psychology en_ZA
dc.title Counter-transference phenomena in the white clinician : a hermeneutic investigation of cross-racial psychotherapy in South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MSc en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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