The other two Houses : the first five years of the Houses of Representatives and Delegates

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Giliomee, Hermann en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Behrens, Gerd en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-12-20T15:30:45Z
dc.date.available 2015-12-20T15:30:45Z
dc.date.issued 1989 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Behrens, G. 1989. The other two Houses : the first five years of the Houses of Representatives and Delegates. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/15830
dc.description Bibliography: pages 353-378. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Defying widespread predictions, the tricameral Parliament not only continues to function but, after five years, has become an integral part of the political realities in South Africa. This thesis is concerned with an assessment of the dynamics of the new dispensation in general and the role played by the Houses of Representatives and Delegates in particular. It evaluates the implications of the new dispensation for the government, participants in government created, racially segregated bodies and the extra-Parliamentary opposition. In addition, it synthesizes empirical data and theory by applying concepts of ethnicity and by reviewing the tricameral system in the light of the theoretical discussions on consociation and "control". The general elections of September 1989 have been used as a cut-off point for this study because the poll amongst Coloureds and Indians provides an opportunity to observe the effects of the performance of the "other" two Houses. Although it is too early for an exhaustive evaluation of the tricameral system, three preliminary conclusions can be drawn. Firstly, despite its failure to gain legitimacy in wider circles, the new dispensation proved to be a qualified success for the government, particularly in so far as it has managed to involve Coloured and Indian participants in the administration of their "own" affairs. Secondly, after an acquiescent start the two new chambers began to utilize the not inconsiderable potential innate to the Constitution of 1983 but failed to bridge the gulf separating them from the mainstream of black opposition. Thirdly, events in and more significantly outside Parliament, seriously undermined the success of the boycott strategy employed by the extra-Parliamentary opposition. While conducting research into apartheid institutions it has become necessary to use official terminology, for example, whites, Coloureds, Indians, Africans. It goes without saying that this does not imply any measure of acceptance of government policy. The methodology of the study is outlined in a brief appendix. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Political Studies en_ZA
dc.subject.other Coloured people (South Africa) - Politics and government en_ZA
dc.subject.other Indians - South Africa - Politics and government en_ZA
dc.title The other two Houses : the first five years of the Houses of Representatives and Delegates en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Political Studies en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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