A simulated history of Aloe dichotoma recruitment and its link to rainfall : insights from an isolated population near Kenhardt

 

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Hoffman, Timm en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Jack, Sam en_ZA
dc.contributor.author van Blerk, Justin en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-15T10:33:05Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-15T10:33:05Z
dc.date.issued 2013 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation van Blerk, J. 2013. A simulated history of Aloe dichotoma recruitment and its link to rainfall : insights from an isolated population near Kenhardt. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/14021
dc.description.abstract Aloe dichotoma populations differ in their rates of recruitment and mortality across the species distribution in South Western Africa. Little is known about how recruitment and mortality rates are affected by local climate and ecological factors. Using repeat photography and a statistical recruitment model, the recruitment history of an emerging population of over 200 A. dichotoma individuals near Kenhardt was simulated. Historical rainfall data was used in order to assess the possible link between rainfall and recruitment. Recruitment patterns were found to be a combination of episodic events of varying length and magnitude superimposed over a background of low-rate continuous recruitment. The largest, most extended episodic recruitment period peaked in the mid-1970s and led to the establishment of most of the individuals in the Kenhardt population. These trees were generally between 150 and 250 cm in height (2013). Newly discovered juveniles below 100 cm in height were predominantly the result of relatively small and brief episodic recruitment events that occurred in the mid and late 2000s. Between episodic recruitment events, evidence for low-rate continuous recruitment is present, particularly in more recent years. Episodic periods of high-rate recruitment were found to be linked to high rainfall. The largest, most extended recruitment period coincided with the exceptionally high rainfall of the 1970s. The more recent episodic recruitment events also coincided with high rainfall spikes during the 2000s. While correlations between rainfall variables and recruitment were significant, many other factors may affect the strength of this relationship. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.title A simulated history of Aloe dichotoma recruitment and its link to rainfall : insights from an isolated population near Kenhardt en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Biological Sciences en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Honours en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname BSc (Hons) en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record