Impacts of environmental change on large terrestrial bird species in South Africa: insights from citizen science data

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Underhill, Leslie G en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisor Barnard, P en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Hofmeyr, Sally D en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-01-27T09:25:02Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-27T09:25:02Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Hofmeyr, S. 2012. Impacts of environmental change on large terrestrial bird species in South Africa: insights from citizen science data. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12306
dc.description Includes abstract. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Large terrestrial bird species, especially cranes and bustards, have adapted to low intensity agriculture to varying degrees, but large-scale industrial agriculture is in general inimical to these species. Cranes are charismatic and well studied, but bustards are retiring and in general cryptically coloured, and little is known of most species. Of South Africa's 10 bustard species, two are endemic and three subspecies are endemic or near-endemic. Six species are threatened or near-threatened. Three crane species occur in South Africa, one of which is near-endemic; all are threatened. This thesis used data from two long-term public participation bird monitoring projects to improve our understanding of six of these 13 species. The first and second Southern African Bird Atlas Projects (SABAP1, 1987-1992, and SABAP2, 2007-) provide two sets of presence/absence data which can be compared. The Coordinated Avifaunal Roadcounts (CAR; 1993-) project provides roadcount data spanning a similar period. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Ornithology en_ZA
dc.title Impacts of environmental change on large terrestrial bird species in South Africa: insights from citizen science data en_ZA
dc.type Doctoral Thesis
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Science en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral
dc.type.qualificationname PhD en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image
dc.identifier.apacitation Hofmeyr, S. D. (2012). <i>Impacts of environmental change on large terrestrial bird species in South Africa: insights from citizen science data</i>. (Thesis). University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12306 en_ZA
dc.identifier.chicagocitation Hofmeyr, Sally D. <i>"Impacts of environmental change on large terrestrial bird species in South Africa: insights from citizen science data."</i> Thesis., University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, 2012. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12306 en_ZA
dc.identifier.vancouvercitation Hofmeyr SD. Impacts of environmental change on large terrestrial bird species in South Africa: insights from citizen science data. [Thesis]. University of Cape Town ,Faculty of Science ,Percy FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, 2012 [cited yyyy month dd]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12306 en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Thesis / Dissertation AU - Hofmeyr, Sally D AB - Large terrestrial bird species, especially cranes and bustards, have adapted to low intensity agriculture to varying degrees, but large-scale industrial agriculture is in general inimical to these species. Cranes are charismatic and well studied, but bustards are retiring and in general cryptically coloured, and little is known of most species. Of South Africa's 10 bustard species, two are endemic and three subspecies are endemic or near-endemic. Six species are threatened or near-threatened. Three crane species occur in South Africa, one of which is near-endemic; all are threatened. This thesis used data from two long-term public participation bird monitoring projects to improve our understanding of six of these 13 species. The first and second Southern African Bird Atlas Projects (SABAP1, 1987-1992, and SABAP2, 2007-) provide two sets of presence/absence data which can be compared. The Coordinated Avifaunal Roadcounts (CAR; 1993-) project provides roadcount data spanning a similar period. DA - 2012 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2012 T1 - Impacts of environmental change on large terrestrial bird species in South Africa: insights from citizen science data TI - Impacts of environmental change on large terrestrial bird species in South Africa: insights from citizen science data UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11427/12306 ER - en_ZA


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