Cultural variations in the presentation of depression in female patients at Valkenberg Hospital

 

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dc.contributor.advisor Shabalala, Nokuthula en_ZA
dc.contributor.author Khumalo, Nokwanda en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-01-06T18:59:28Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-06T18:59:28Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Khumalo, N. 2008. Cultural variations in the presentation of depression in female patients at Valkenberg Hospital. University of Cape Town. en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11427/11646
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 63-77). en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Depression is a significant problem for both developed and developing countries. Local and international literature indicates that there are culturally mediated differences in presentation that contribute to more women being diagnosed with depression than men and to the predominance of particualar features of the illness in different settings. The aim of this archival study was to explore the presentation of depression across race groups in female patients at Valkenberg Hospital in the Western Cape. The narratives of patients' presenting complaints were obtained from the history taking notes in 46 hospital files, comprised of three sets of 15 files belonging to Black, White and Coloured patients, and one file belonging to a patient of Asian origin. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the narratives. Findings revealed that patients across race groups viewed depression as occurring in and resulting from interpersonal problems. However, White and Coloured patients also related their main problem to emotional distress, which was the main trigger for seeking help. Black patients reported difficulties in coping with life stressors as their main complaint, and frequently cited experiences of gender based violence. Distress seems to be tolerated until it manifests in behavioural disturbances. It was found that Black patients sought help only when their behaviour became distruptive for those around them. It was also observed that depression with psychotic featues and a co-morbid HIV diagnosis were reported most frequently among Black patients. There were thus similarities and differences in the presentation of depression across race groups. Patients' understandings of depression are mediated by various socio-cultural factors. en_ZA
dc.language.iso eng en_ZA
dc.subject.other Clinical Psychology en_ZA
dc.title Cultural variations in the presentation of depression in female patients at Valkenberg Hospital en_ZA
dc.type Thesis / Dissertation en_ZA
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource Thesis en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.publisher.department Department of Psychology en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationlevel Masters en_ZA
dc.type.qualificationname MA en_ZA
uct.type.filetype Text
uct.type.filetype Image


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