Estimating the effect of adolescent fertility on educational attainment in Cape Town using a propensity score weighted regression

 

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dc.creator Ranchhod, Vimal
dc.creator Lam, David
dc.creator Leibbrandt, Murray
dc.creator Marteleto, Letitia
dc.date 2012-12-03T12:07:09Z
dc.date 2012-12-03T12:07:09Z
dc.date 2011-03
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-28T10:05:06Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-28T10:05:06Z
dc.date.issued 2015-05-28
dc.identifier http://hdl.handle.net/11090/58
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11090/58
dc.description We estimate the effect of a teenage birth on the educational attainment of young mothers in Cape Town, South Africa. Longitudinal and retrospective data on youth from the CAPS dataset are used. We control for a number of early life and pre-fertility characteristics. We also reweight our data using a propensity score matching process to generate a more appropriate counterfactual group. Accounting for respondent characteristics reduces estimates of the effect of a teen birth on dropping out of school, successfully completing secondary school, and years of schooling attained. Our best estimates of the effect of a teen birth on high school graduation by ages 20 and 22 are -5.9 and -2.7 percentage points respectively. The former is significant at the 5% level,while the latter is not statistically significant. Thus, there appears to be some 'catching up' in educational attainment by teen mothers. We find only limited support for the hypothesis that there is heterogeneity in the effect of a teen birth, depending on the actual age of the first birth. By age 22, none of the estimates for high school graduation or years of schooling are statistically significant, regardless of the specific age at which the teen birth occurred. Despite this, we do find evidence that a teen birth does correlate with reduced educational expectations. The proportion of teen mothers who report an expected final educational attainment of high school graduation or greater is about 15 percentage points lower than the matched set of non-teen mothers, but this is not manifest amongst the girls whom we know will subsequently become teen mothers at some point after these expectations are measured.
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit
dc.subject Propensity score matching
dc.subject Teenage birth
dc.subject Educational attainment
dc.subject Longitudinal data
dc.subject CAPS
dc.title Estimating the effect of adolescent fertility on educational attainment in Cape Town using a propensity score weighted regression
dc.type Report
uct.type.publication Research en_ZA
uct.type.resource SALDRU Report en_ZA
dc.publisher.institution University of Cape Town
dc.publisher.faculty Faculty of Commerce en_ZA
dc.publisher.department SALDRU en_ZA
dc.identifier.ris TY - Report DA - 2015-05-28 DB - OpenUCT DP - University of Cape Town KW - Propensity score matching KW - Teenage birth KW - Educational attainment KW - Longitudinal data KW - CAPS LK - https://open.uct.ac.za PB - University of Cape Town PY - 2015 T1 - Estimating the effect of adolescent fertility on educational attainment in Cape Town using a propensity score weighted regression TI - Estimating the effect of adolescent fertility on educational attainment in Cape Town using a propensity score weighted regression UR - http://hdl.handle.net/11090/58 ER - en_ZA


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